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Blueprints for more than 7,000 homes across Great Yarmouth borough

10:01 11 December 2015

Breydon Bridge and Vauxhall Bridge. Homes are earmarked for the riverside area of Great Yarmouth.  Picture: James Bass

Breydon Bridge and Vauxhall Bridge. Homes are earmarked for the riverside area of Great Yarmouth. Picture: James Bass

Archant Norfolk Photographic © 2012

A blueprint for the future of Great Yarmouth would see riverside areas of the town refreshed and more than 7,000 homes built in the borough.

Graham Plant, leader of Great Yarmouth Borough CouncilGraham Plant, leader of Great Yarmouth Borough Council

The borough council’s powerful cabinet this week approved the adoption of the new core strategy, which sets out an overarching vision for the area to 2030.

Central government requires that local authorities draw up a local plan, and the core strategy is the first document of this.

Government planning inspector Malcolm Rivett asked that the number of homes built over this period be increased to 7,140 from an original lower target of 5,700.

Two strategic sites have been identified for the bulk of the homes.

These are the Beacon Park extension site, near the new link road south of Bradwell, where around 1,000 homes have been earmarked, and a part of Yarmouth described as the waterfront area, where a further 1,000 homes are earmarked.

The waterfront area refers to riverside land at Cobholm between Breydon Bridge to south of Haven Bridge; on the Asda side of the river from Breydon Bridge round to Vauxhall Bridge and on to Runham; and on the east side of the river from Vauxhall Bridge to Haven Bridge, and inland around The Conge.

“The waterfront area in the heart of Great Yarmouth has the potential to become a vibrant urban quarter that utilises its rich heritage and prime urban riverside location to create a unique and high quality environment for housing, shopping and offices which is attractive to investors and visitors as well as new and existing residents,” the report states.

Graham Plant, leader of the council, hailed the core strategy report as a “fantastic” piece of work at this week’s cabinet meeting.

It sets out ambitions to provide safe pedestrian links throughout and to neighbouring areas, with high quality public transport services.

There are also hopes of improving links between the railway station and Market Place, and to maximise public access to the waterfront area through the use of walkways and open spaces, where this does not conflict with port activity or safety requirements.

The report also sets out a vision to make the most of the “prime riverside location” by creating “distinctive high quality architecture of an appropriate scale” that complements the surrounding historic environment.

Heritage assets of the area such as the historic townscape and important historic buildings would also be made the most of, converting buildings to other uses where appropriate.

“By 2030, the borough of Great Yarmouth will be a more attractive and aspirational place to live, work and play, with strong links to Lowestoft, the Broads, Norwich, rural Norfolk and the wider New Anglia (Norfolk and Suffolk) Local Enterprise Partnership area,” the report says.

It notes that the borough’s population is 97,300, an increase of 6.9% in the last decade.

The majority of new homes would be built in in Yarmouth and Gorleston, and “key service centres” like Bradwell and Caister.

It is hoped that the expansion of the energy sector and port industries with the continuing attraction of the coast and the Broads will “substantially reduce” seasonal unemployment, and a third river crossing over the River Yare is envisioned.

The inspector recommended that the amount of new retail floorspace allocated be reduced as it was not required.

21 comments

  • Let's get into reality .. The infrastructure is just not in the area to cope with 7000 new homes. It means 7000 plus more cars, 7000 to 10.000 more jobs needed, 14.000 plus to be added to Dentists surgeries, 14.000 to GP surgeries.. Which are all under stress now ... Then More pressure onto James Pagett hospital and A and E dept. which is also struggling now .. A hundred extra beds will be needed in the near future as the population increases. Where is the room for extra beds and Nurses and car parking... Then there is the increased traffic congestion that will follow each year .. The basic Infrastructure is not always coping now... If 7000 homes are built by 2030 in theory that could be 7000 families of 4 people meaning up to 28.000 people in total .. Will the Acle straight be dualled by then or will increased traffic using this road mean more of the obvious accident rate... Then there is schooling places and lack of car parking now ... GY area must be near its infrustuture limit, adding thousands more population without increasing the basic amount of all basic services is bound to infuriate the local population already living here... And more stress is sure to follow... As more people move into the GY area.. Try phoning for a GP appointment or sitting in A and E or parking in GY in the summer now ... Remember GY is an island and a bridges have to be used for a mixture of many thousands of cars, vans, lorries and buses everyday to get on and off the island .. Increasing the traffic flow in future years will possibly create a lot of traffic flow and parking frustration ..so By increasing the current population .. You increase the current problems... So Without increasing the current infrustuture and services.. Watch out... Basic logic..

    Report this comment

    Lionel

    Saturday, December 12, 2015

  • I would not move to Great yarmouth as the locals are very unfriendly and it has developed large gangs of so called europeans standing on the streetcorners. Actually the state of the streets are a health hazard to walk around I wonder were all that council tax is going o look there goes another fat councillor.

    Report this comment

    marshancar

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • @Daisy - Dear Daisy, you may have convinced yourself that your comments were directed at GYBC (or you are certainly attempting to post rationalise it as thus) but it's certainly not what you said. You said, "Meanwhile the surrounding area is a regular congregation of the unemployed the inadequate the alcohol dependent. The streets become more and more run down as landlords and owners fail to maintain residential and retail premises". There is nothing about the borough council in there, no it's simply a slur on the people of the borough. Perhaps you would be kind enough to explain exactly who the 'inadequate' are, and how describing people as such is in any way commentary on the policies of GYBC? Good luck.....you'll need it.

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap2

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Good point andy, i think people that are willing to vote us out of the EU will be in for a shock when after independance the gates to britain are not narrowed but totally dismantled.

    Report this comment

    cal

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Cal, in his recent budget, Osborne is relying on immigration of at least 180,000 a year to meet his aspiration of balancing the budget during this parliament. He did not announce this of course but his runaway in the small print. That is why he and the government want to build so many houses - they never had any intention of reducing net immigration and leaving the EU will make no difference given their intentions.

    Report this comment

    andy

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Im just wondering whether we still need to build as many homes now that a brexit is looking more likely since the refugee crisis and camerons mime act of a renegotiation ?

    Report this comment

    cal

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • This is horse before cart. As mentioned, where will the jobs come from for the people who are supposed to buy these properties? Are they all to be social housing and if so what benefit would that bring? The town should be putting all it's effort into ensuring there is a decent rail link and a decent road link. Once that is in place, the commercial and economic opportunities will be apparent to all and everything else will follow.

    Report this comment

    theanchovy

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • And another post and an objective one and not Milecrossy.Anyone here on the ground can see that a lot of the housing GY will need in the next few years will be rental housing. It is hard to see how all of the population which has increased the size of Yarmouth will anytime soon be in a position to buy if lender conditions continue as they are. Presumably the first time buyers who would previously have bought in the town are buying in the new estates in the villages and there will be a need there as long as the demand for rental housing continues to grow, I have no idea of the state of social housing waiting lists but suspect the hidden housing crisis in Yarmouth is that of young people who struggle to afford rents and to live independently. The problem is the supply of permanent full time jobs with a living wage. I don't see a shortage of luxury riverside developments as a problem.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Actually it really is a crying shame that tucked away all over Yarmouth there are some lovely properties that are underused, empty or neglected and which would be fought over in Brighton or Cambridge-really quaint individual early Victorian town cottages in tiny closes and yards, some beautiful buildings on King Street, sound Edwardian terraces , streets of former B&Bs with really nicely proportioned rooms and very old properties on some of the remaining Rows. Massive shame that there has been no policy to help the town and that regeneration money meant for the Nelson Ward got spent on the sea front. Owners should be invited to improve their properties with the chance of a council tax holiday if they do so.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • This is Yarmouth Rushall chap which since the offshore boom ended has been at the mercy of the council. It is a world away from Norwich. Perhaps in this light your comment about Cambridge vs Norwich does look more justified. I know the sites touted for this riverside development and they would be better used for improving junctions, the station and for non residential use, Then there is the flood risk. The one compensation is that the fish meal quay no longer operates. The owner of the bingo hall did in the past express an interest in the casino and turning the Conge and surrounding areas into a visitor attraction which would have been excellent and appropriate but sea front interests put a tin hat on that. I agree that the saving of Yarmouth would be to become Norwich on Sea in the same way that Thetford and Downham are becoming dormitories for Cambridge. I have been saying for a long time that there is a neglected reserve of housing stock in the old town which the council has wilfully ignored and failed to bring back into use by residents who are likely to commute and have more in the way of disposable income. The state of the town is off putting to purchasers and to holiday makers alike and that is the fault of GYBC which is now spinning these not so new ideas. The state of the road network is a deterrent to commuters. and the rail service such that commuting much further than Norwich is not easy. The structure plan for the whole borough adopted in a hurry at the government's behest is a mess-a lot of houses planned for where the roads really are inadequate and the schools are already overburdened in a borough where a lot of people can only dream of renting. What could well happen is that the proposed developments are bought not by commuters or locals but by relocating downsizers or down pricers-which is all very well so long as they bring money into the area and not their imminent care needs. The comments critical of GYBC Rushall, are there because posters know GYBCs track record of incompetence not because of any insularity.Some of us are in GY because we work or have worked in a much wider world than Norfolk

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Generally speaking a good idea. It is in fact based on the previous efforts of 1st East. Yarmouth must look to improve it's transport links to Norwich and must avoid building poor quality infrastructure. A fast train link , decent road and good facilities would make Yarmouth a popular place to live for those commuting to Norwich as well as working in the town. Forget trying to remake GY as a shopping destination, it is too late! Remove all town centre parking charges, drop business rates and encourage new uses of empty space, Think of the town as the sea side version of Norwich and think of Norwich as one would have considered London a few years ago. It is a great opportunity but one I fear is already being hijacked by the property developers.

    Report this comment

    Nick

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Generally speaking a good idea. It is in fact based on the previous efforts of 1st East. Yarmouth must look to improve it's transport links to Norwich and must avoid building poor quality infrastructure. A fast train link , decent road and good facilities would make Yarmouth a popular place to live for those commuting to Norwich as well as working in the town. Forget trying to remake GY as a shopping destination, it is too late! Remove all town centre parking charges, drop business rates and encourage new uses of empty space, Think of the town as the sea side version of Norwich and think of Norwich as one would have considered London a few years ago. It is a great opportunity but one I fear is already being hijacked by the property developers.

    Report this comment

    Nick

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • I am still trying to work out if they are stupid or very clever! Stupid in wanting to build in areas which look quite unsuitable because of where they want to build. Or clever because they know it will not work or get planning approval because of flood risk. Thereby putting off building lots more houses which they cannot be serviced because of limitations on NHS, schools, etc. Still what a wonderful opportunity to trot out lots of cliches - vibrant urban quarter, rich heritage, unique and high quality environment, distinctive high quality architecture, make it an aspirational place to live work and play, etc. etc... Do these people really believe any of it?

    Report this comment

    andy

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Great to see that GYBC have been wise enough not to build on a flood plain. ;-))

    Report this comment

    DWW25

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Great to see that GYBC have been wise enough not to build on a flood plain. ;-))

    Report this comment

    DWW25

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • In a week when we have a big Conference in Paris about global warming, sea-level rise and the threat to low-lying areas, combined with biblical rainfall and flooding in our Lake District, it is ridiculous for planners to propose building in these areas. It is also the case that, because such properties are uninsurable through flood risk, those of us who choose to live in sensibly-situated properties are now being expected to pay, through our insurance premiums, a levy towards insuring flood-risk properties. This may conceivably be justified this for properties already long-built, but I strongly object to being taxed because fools build new housing in flood areas.

    Report this comment

    T Doff

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • And where would all these new residents work?

    Report this comment

    peter waller

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • @Daisy - earlier this week you accused me of having a jaundiced view of Norfolk because I dared to suggest that it would be madness for Cambridge to tether it's economic future to the county. I explained to view that my opinion was based on my experience and the unrelentingly negative comments on this very website. Many delight in running down any sort of progress; be that new housing, new roads, cycle paths, new commercial ventures in fact almost any sort of progress at all. Now here you are passing judgement on GY, it's inhabitants and rubbishing an opportunity because it doesn't conform to your masterplan and opinion for and on everything, hmmm. I believe the saying is along the lines of reaping what one sows.

    Report this comment

    Rushallchap2

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • I quite like Yarmouth, but as for living there.

    Report this comment

    Bloater

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • Cobholm-protected for now but under water in 53-really sensible place to be building more homes-not. what happened to the grand plans for converting the former government building on Yarmouth Way-still standing empty, appalling place to consider converting to flats-vertical slums-but no one wants it for offices. Meanwhile the surrounding area is a regular congregation of the unemployed the inadequate the alcohol dependent. The streets become more and more run down as landlords and owners fail to maintain residential and retail premises. yes the place is busy, lots of people working very hard to make a life in the town, but at a very low income level and it needs help bottom up to turn it back into a decent place to live, not just fancy developer speak .

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, December 11, 2015

  • These people are idiots. No one with money is going to want to risk it in Yarmouth until the council sorts out the general condition of the town. Living beside the stinking mud and damp of the Yare is stupid unless residents have plenty of money. Prone to flooding, no spare space for car parking and the area is noisy because of essential road junctions-who do these fools think will buy there unless the prices are cheap enough for buy to let land lords? Where do they think the young people are earning enough money to buy riverside apartments? Commuting to Norwich via the undualled A47? The best use there is commercial and leisure-the long awaited casino should have been there, offices and some clubs-few residents to disturb. There are endless big nice Victorian properties in Yarmouth which would have been attractive to buyers if streets had been gated and protected from conversion to HMOs. As for developments elsewhere GYBC is happy to allow random development with inadequate provision for infrastructure improvements Who can have any faith in plans guided by a chip shop owner?

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Friday, December 11, 2015

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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