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Great Yarmouth esplanade bike ban lifted for summer - do you think cyclists and pedestrians mix?

10:06 10 May 2013

Great Yarmouth esplanade North of Britannia Pier where the council plans to allow cycling.


Picture: James Bass

Great Yarmouth esplanade North of Britannia Pier where the council plans to allow cycling. Picture: James Bass

Archant Norfolk © 2013

The ban on cycling along a busy stretch of Great Yarmouth seafront has been lifted - leading to fears of accidents and crashes.

While supporters say the move to allow bikes to zip along the northern section of the esplanade this summer will bring enormous benefit to the town, opponents claim it will be dangerous and impossible to monitor as people rarely report accidents between bikes and pedestrians.

Great Yarmouth Borough Council has revoked a bylaw banning bikes during from May to September. The move allows cyclists to use the esplanade from the Euston Road car park to north of the boating lake with immediate effect.

Gorleston cyclist Neil Turner, of social enterprise Activating CIC - the group planning to transform Yarmouth’s North Drive bowls pavilion into a cycling hub, believes it will work “as long as both cyclists and pedestrians co-operate”.

Others, including the Norfolk branch of campaign group Living Streets, are less convinced.

The move to allow cyclists is a trial period in line with the test-run already underway on Gorleston’s lower promenade and will be reviewed at the end of Semptember.

• See today’s paper for the full story.

25 comments

  • [Post removed by Moderator]

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    Frank Fryup

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Why stop at bikes? Why not allow motorbikes and cars along there too? The outcome will be the same - people (and dogs) are going to get hurt!

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    pinklipstick

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Should work ok so long as they ban or control dog walkers, far to many have their dogs off a lead or on stretchy leads that can either trip up a walker or a cyclist

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    blister

    Tuesday, May 14, 2013

  • NO, pedestrians and cyclists do not mix, there will be heavy footfall along all of the seafront, there are cafe's with outside seating which means the biker's will be riding - in certain places - will not have enough safe room to ride. There will be children running up and down from the beach who could get hurt, there will be biker's who will have no regard for pedestrians and peddle at whatever speed they want and weave in and out of the crowds without thinking of others, I've seen young biker's racing each other down the esplanade before now and how can biker's 'zipping along' the esplanade bring benefit to Great Yarmouth, How?

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    Spooky

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Segregated cycle lanes are the answer

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    Frank Fryup

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • What another brilliant, well thought out decision by GYBC..... I wonder what would happen if a Councillor's child or grandchild got ploughed into and injured due to a collision? As a bike rider, this is a potty idea. (Plus I can't imagine any councillors walking anywhere in Great Yarmouth anyhow as they always have their eyes shut to what's around them!!! )

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    wes1975

    Sunday, May 12, 2013

  • What another brilliant, well thought out decision by GYBC..... I wonder what would happen if a Councillor's child or grandchild got ploughed into and injured due to a collision? As a bike rider, this is a potty idea. (Plus I can't imagine any councillors walking anywhere in Great Yarmouth anyhow as they always have their eyes shut to what's around them!!! )

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    wes1975

    Sunday, May 12, 2013

  • Of course its a good idea. Unless you have been living in a cave for the past 5 years, you will realise that cycling is one of the fastest growing leisure activities and many visitors to our region come here due to our great cycling roads and countryside. This should hopefully generate more visitors and therefore more tourist cash. Serious accidents between cyclists and pedestrians are extremely rare and provided that there is give and take on both sides, it should be a commendable move.

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    Snomaes

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • [Post removed by Moderator]

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    Frank Fryup

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Why not let cyclists use it? There are no holiday makers anyway! A bit of paint is all it takes to make it safer...

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    Caister Waster

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Haven't been to Lowestoft since last summer, but I seem to remember the seafront having a wider walkway than Yarmouth, that's probably why it may be working, but two people side by side or parents holding on to children at Yarmouth take up most of the room, so a bike is going to be a hazard for them. In all honesty why should people have to get out of the way of bikes, I've never seen someone on a bike get out of the way of a pedestrian, they aim straight at them and expect them to move, going around corners is also going to be a hazard if they extend it.

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    Spooky

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • I've cycled along here almost every day for the past 15 years.not once have I been in collision with anything neither have I ever been stopped or reprimanded for cycling where I shouldn't be. this really is a non story.

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    timmy_two_sheds

    Sunday, May 12, 2013

  • Segregated cycle lanes are the answer

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    Frank Fryup

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Lowestoft seafront does have a designated cycle lane on the seafront - it still doesnt stop near misses though with peoplechildren and dogs as people meander around and forget about the cycle lane. I cant see how this is going to work in Great Yarmouth or Gorleston and I would love to know what the 'enormous benefit' actually is.

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    Mrs Meldrew

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Keep them on the roads if they want to use a pavement they should damn well walk on it. Too many times have I seen moronic cyclists thinking they have the right of way on pavements.

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    Bri.

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • "opponents claim it will be dangerous and impossible to monitor as people rarely report accidents between bikes and pedestrian" haha! or...we have nothing but anecdotal evidence based on nothing more than misplaced fearbigotryignorance (delete as necessary). In all seriousness, I really don't care if cyclists are banned, but since they are going to try it as a trial run it seems silly to assume (with no evidence) that its somehow going to be a bad thing.

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    monkeynuts

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Segregated cycle lanes are the answer

    Report this comment

    Frank Fryup

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Gorleston Promenade was designed for walking, not for cyclists, scooterists, cars etc. It should be a place where a family can take a leisurely stroll without having to worry about what is coming from behind. Let's keep this place safe for families.

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    Nigel

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • "impossible to monitor as people rarely report accidents between bikes and pedestrians" And the reason that they rarely report them is that they are rarely serious. This is a great idea - stop trying to wrap people in cotton wool and make them responsible for their own safety!

    Report this comment

    Max Headroom

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • [Post removed by Moderator]

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    Frank Fryup

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • An absurd idea. People like to dawdle on holiday or visiting and should not have to jump out of the way of bikes 'zipping' along. Quite how turning shopping centres or esplanades into pedestriancyclist dodgems is supposed to encourage trade is beyond me.

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    kevin bacon

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Well I think it is a good idea so long as the cycle part is marked and is wall side not beach side. North Drive is lined with parked cars in summer making cycling tricky when they are pulling in and out. So long as there are warning signs for cyclists this will be good for kids and adults What i would really like to see is GYBC and sustrans or other cycling organisation have the courage to take up a proposal first made years ago but long dropped from the structure which was to create a cycle path along the right of way on the old rail line from GY to Martham. Even as far as Hemsby is easily possible if the encroachment of the caravan parks on the right of way was subject to prosecution A little bit of sand removal and a bit of foundation matting and tarmac would suffice from North Denes as far as California and then there is road and a ROW as far as Hemsby-a bit narrow and over grown in places but it would be an asset to the north of the borough, good for kids going to school in Caister and good for holiday makers.

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    Daisy Roots

    Saturday, May 11, 2013

  • As a cyclist,I think it is a ridiculous idea. What pleasure can be derived for cycling amongst strolling pedestrians and especially toddlers is beyond me. It annoys the hell out me when cyclists are on the pavement. What was the reason for this very bad decision. I am not aware of a large groundswell of cyclists demanding this. How it will help tourism? Cyclists colliding with walkers of all sizes will not be a great attraction. Unless there are enough for it to become popular spectator sport.

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    norman hall

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • I guess were about to find out in gy. Its seems to work just fine in Lowestoft.

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    Paul Morley

    Friday, May 10, 2013

  • Off course its a good idea. If we must regulate, paint it on or demarcate in other ways when resurfacing comes up.

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Friday, May 10, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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