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Brotherly row ends in court

PUBLISHED: 16:07 14 August 2008 | UPDATED: 11:35 03 July 2010

AN offshore worker who grappled with his brother and struggled with police after drinking several pints of cider was sentenced to a 12 month community order.

AN offshore worker who grappled with his brother and struggled with police after drinking several pints of cider was sentenced to a 12 month community order.

Ian Clements, of Stafford Road, Southtown, appeared before the town's magistrates on Monday charged with threatening behaviour.

Clements, 39, pleaded guilty to the offence which took place on July 25.

Prosecuting, Gary Mayle said that plain clothes officers were patrolling the Southtown area when they noticed Clements grappling with another man.

He said: “Police approached both parties and Clements began to struggle, ignoring the requests of officers, swinging his arms around.”

Mr Mayle explained a woman at the scene, Clements' girlfriend, was caught up in the struggle and was hit in the side of the face by Clements.

“She did not wish to pursue a complaint. Clements continued to struggle and resisted considerably. Eventually he was tripped over and put to the floor however he continued to struggle and officers were forced to use CS gas. He was cuffed and taken to the station.”

During interview Clements told police he had been drinking with his girlfriend and brother from about 5pm and later that evening had got into an argument with his brother.

Mitigating, Claire Collins told the court that Clements was “extremely ashamed” about his behaviour that evening when he had consumed about six or seven pints of cider and had not touched a drop of alcohol since that evening.

She said: “Until he spoke to his girlfriend the following day he had no recollection of the event.”

The court heard that it was “not normal behaviour” for Clements.

“He got into an argument with his brother. He was trying to walk home and can remember pushing his brother away. He cannot remember why he hit his girlfriend. It was his first night home from being offshore and perhaps the drink affected him more than it would have normally.”

Clements, a father of two, was sentenced to 160 hours of unpaid work over a period of 12 months and ordered to pay £60 costs.

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