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Nature haven in Broads reopens car park and gardens

PUBLISHED: 15:05 13 May 2020 | UPDATED: 15:24 13 May 2020

Simon Partridge, director of How Hill, a nature reserve in the Norfolk Broads which has reopened its carpark and gardens as lockdown eases in England. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust.

Simon Partridge, director of How Hill, a nature reserve in the Norfolk Broads which has reopened its carpark and gardens as lockdown eases in England. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust.

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A nature haven has reopened its gardens and car park to provide the public with a place for exercise as the coronavirus lockdown restrictions are eased.

How Hill, a nature reserve in the Norfolk Broads, has reopened its carpark and gardens as lockdown eases in England. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust.How Hill, a nature reserve in the Norfolk Broads, has reopened its carpark and gardens as lockdown eases in England. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust.

How Hill, a charity-funded environmental study centre for the Broads based in Ludham, is also hoping to collect donations to help its funds after its core work as a residential study centre for schools has dried up for the summer.

Director Simon Partridge said people were already starting to park in the narrow local lanes as they sought new locations for their daily walks – so it made sense to reopen the centre’s car park to ease congestion and help the public explore the gardens.

How Hill has formal gardens close to the house which have been tended throughout the virus crisis by gardener Chris Tubby, while the teaching and catering staff are furloughed with no school visits until the autumn at least.

It also has its Secret Gardens – a set of boardwalked water gardens brimming with exotic plants from around the world as well as azaleas and rhododendrons which are now coming into full bloom.

MORE: Beach car park reopens as village prepares for return of visitors

How Hill has been a study centre since 1968, having been built as a holiday home for the Boardman family in 1904.

It has hosted school and adult residential and day courses since 1968, and has been run by a charitable trust since 1984.

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The site hosts around 3,000 children on residential and day trips each year, and teaches them about nature through fun lessons.

How Hill, a nature reserve in the Norfolk Broads, has reopened its carpark and gardens as lockdown eases in England. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust.How Hill, a nature reserve in the Norfolk Broads, has reopened its carpark and gardens as lockdown eases in England. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust.

Mr Partridge added: “We are sad that How Hill’s educational work, teaching youngsters about nature and the environment, is on hold because of covid-19, but we are glad people can visit us safely on their daily exercise.

“People are obviously keen to visit us, judging by the unofficial parking, so we have opened our car park for safety reasons. We hope people enjoy walking the gardens – and if they care to drop a donation into our collection boxes to help our funds at this difficult time it will be much appreciated.”

For more information about How Hill, its work, walks and gardens, please visit its website https://howhilltrust.org.uk


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