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Clueless trainee doctor struck off

PUBLISHED: 16:25 30 October 2008 | UPDATED: 12:08 03 July 2010

A “CLUELESS” trainee doctor who worked at the James Paget University hospital was struck off this week by the General Medical Council after he failed a basic test that porters had to pass.

A “CLUELESS” trainee doctor who worked at the James Paget University hospital was struck off this week by the General Medical Council after he failed a basic test that porters had to pass.

The level of Polish medical graduate Robert Miela's knowledge was so poor that a fellow doctor suspected he was mimicking hospital programmes such as Casualty while he examined patients.

Miela, who now lives in Poland, worked at the JPH as a pre-registration house officer from August 1, 2005 to September 13.

He left after he failed basic life-support tests which even hospital porters have to pass.

Last October, the General Medical Council (GMC) in London suspended Miela on safety grounds after the failed exams revealed large gaps in his knowledge of fundamental medical procedures, including hygiene, death certification and prescribing drugs.

On Wednesday, the GMC struck off Miela because of his lack of medical learning and failure to engage with the organisation since his suspension.

He refused to attend the hearing because he believed he had been the victim of a great injustice and vowed never to return to Britain.

The GMC panel heard that assessors at the JPH had branded Miela as clueless and dangerous after he failed a series of tests.

Dr Guy Vautier told the GMC that Miela effectively dried up when he was asked how to treat a patient with chest pains.

He said: “He sort of looked at me for the next stage to prompt me along.

“My observations of him over the course of those days was such that he would observe somebody, then think “Right, that's the way I am supposed to act.”

Dr Vautier was so concerned about the trainee doctor that he had emailed a colleague with his concerns that he was mimicking hospital television programmes.

When asked by the hearing what level of medical proficiency Miela had, Dr Vautier said: “The bottom. He stood out as clearly the lowest of the weak.”

The GMC heard that Miela had made no effort to contact it since his suspension and no evidence had been shown that he had improved his medical skills.

In a letter, Miela told the hearing: “During my short stay in Britain I committed no wrong, no misdemeanour and no felony. This is and will be my last communiqué between myself and the British machinery.”

In October, the JPH said that Miela was only employed for a short time and he had been under constant supervision and assessment which had highlighted the problem.

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