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Council to resume cutting grass verges as residents vent frustration at ‘untidiness’

PUBLISHED: 16:00 31 May 2020 | UPDATED: 16:07 31 May 2020

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a "mess" after three months of no verge grass-cutting. Photo: Jason Silom

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A council will resume cutting grass verges this week as residents vent frustration at the borough’s “untidness”.

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a "mess" after three months of no verge grass-cutting. Photo: Kevin Yallop

Across Great Yarmouth, the council will begin cutting grass verges from Monday, June 1, but stressed that “necessary and essential services” will remain priority.

In a statement, the council said: “Grass cutting at open spaces, parks and housing community areas resumed last month. Grass cutting of verges will resume from Monday.

“However, whilst lockdown restrictions have been eased slightly, the council is not operating as normal and grass cutting will be on a less frequent basis.

“On larger verges, initially the border of the verge will be cut to free-up time for crews to attended to more verges across the borough.”

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a "mess" after three months of no verge grass-cutting. Photo: Jason Silom

For residents, the resumption of services can’t come soon enough.

Jason Silom, who has been working near Bately Avenue in Gorleston, said that the grass verges in his neighbourhood were “getting out of control”.

He said: “In some places the grass is knee-high, and it’s perfect cover for dog owners who can’t be bothered to pick up after their pet.

“I don’t understand why the council have been taking care of the clifftops and priory gardens, but not verges around the streets?

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a "mess" after three months of no verge grass-cutting. Photo: Jason Silom

“The longer they leave it the harder the job will be when they do finally tackle them.

“It blocks visibility for drivers and means there’s less space available for children without gardens to play in.

“But beyond that it just looks an absolute mess.”

He added that while many people have “taken it upon themselves” to keep their streets tidy, they shouldn’t have to as “that’s what the council gets paid to do”.

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a "mess" after three months of no verge grass-cutting. Photo: Jason Silom

Cliff Park resident Kevin Yallop also said both he and his neighbours were “frustrated at how untidy the area looks”.

He said: “While out driving there are lots of corners and roundabouts obscured - plus, with the grass being left to grow so long, God knows what’s under there? It’s a health and safety risk.

“I would have attempted to cut it myself but I haven’t got the right equipment.”

This news comes as wildlife campaigners urged Norfolk County Council to cut back on how often they trim the region’s grass verges, with a Norfolk Wildlife Trust spokesman arguing that these can be “fantastic habitats for wildlife”.

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a "mess" after three months of no verge grass-cutting. Photo: Kevin Yallop

Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a Residents have said that their neighbourhood looks a "mess" after three months of no verge grass-cutting. Photo: Jason Silom


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