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Councillors support payback scheme

PUBLISHED: 14:41 11 December 2008 | UPDATED: 12:30 03 July 2010

COUNCILLORS have welcomed a new scheme whereby offenders serving community punishments will be required to wear distinctive clothing while carrying out unpaid work.

COUNCILLORS have welcomed a new scheme whereby offenders serving community punishments will be required to wear distinctive clothing while carrying out unpaid work.

The members of Caister Parish Council supported the so-called Community Payback scheme at a meeting last Monday .

The main premise of Community Payback is that the public has the opportunity to have its say on how criminals make amends for the harm they have caused. To highlight the work being done, offenders have to wear high visibility orange bibs with the words Community Payback on the back.

The unpaid work used to be known as community service and often involves completing certain types of work, including graffiti removal, street clean ups, ground clearance, recycling projects and general gardening.

Offenders are typically expected to complete between 40 and 300 hours community service within a 12 month period and have to undertake a minimum of six hours per week.

The idea behind community punishments is to repay criminals' debts to society and generally benefits schools, faith groups, churches, charities and community organisations.


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