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Crime falls in Norfolk

PUBLISHED: 10:27 17 July 2009 | UPDATED: 14:26 03 July 2010

NORFOLK is dramatically safer than it was this time last year, according to figures released today by the Home Office.

The total number of crimes in the county has dropped by 12pc to 49,171 since March 2008, which means Norfolk is now officially the safest county in England.

NORFOLK is dramatically safer than it was this time last year, according to figures released today by the Home Office.

The total number of crimes in the county has dropped by 12pc to 49,171 since March 2008, which means Norfolk is now officially the safest county in England.

Fraud and forgery cases have fallen by 22pc and offences against vehicles have gone down 15pc, while violence against the person and sexual offences have both fallen by 13pc.

Criminal damage has gone down by 14pc and 'other theft offences' have been reduced by 12pc.

However, the number of robbery cases has stayed the same, as has the number of drug offences, and burglaries and 'other offences' are up by 4pc and 8pc.

The figures have been hailed as evidence of Norfolk Police's successful operations, which include Operation Radar, a joint initiative with Trading Standards which targets rogue traders and has seen more than 40 people arrested.

Norfolk now has just 58 crimes per thousand population, and leads in specific categories, including burglary, for which it is the second best county in the country, and violence against the person, for which it is the best.

Chief Constable Ian McPherson said: “Our business is essentially a people business. These results are a clear indication that our people care about the people of Norfolk and care about creating a safe environment for everyone to enjoy.”

Assistant Chief Constable Simon Bailey said he too was pleased with the results, and pledged to keep the figures relatively low during the recession, adding: “We'll be continuing efforts to maintain and continually improve our position, but I have to be concerned about the effects of the current economic climate when previous recessions have seen crime rise.

“My job will be to make sure there is no let up as we work with our partners to make Norfolk as safe as it can be.”


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