More than three violent and sex offences reported a day in Great Yarmouth

Calls about domestic abuse to a team which helps protect vulnerable children went up during the coro

Domestic abuse is said to be behind a lot of the offences reported - Credit: PA

More than three reports of violent crime and sexual offences are made in Great Yarmouth every day, crime figures show.

The borough saw 5,717 violent and sex offences last year, up 14pc on 2020 and 2,244 more than the average since 2017.

Violence and sexual offences cover 57 separate crimes ranging from murder and rape to death by dangerous driving and modern slavery. 

Domestic Abuse - The Reality, by Laura Dodsworth, commissioned by Scottish Womens Aid. Copyright Lau

More domestic abuse cases are being reported following the murder of Sarah Everard - Credit: Laura Dodsworth

And a further breakdown of crime figures for Great Yarmouth shows the south of the town had 104 violent and sex offences reported in January 2022.

The figures on www.police.uk - based on official government statistics - show over a three year period up to January this year there were 3,879 of those types of offence recorded, the equivalent of more than three a day.

This crime map on police.uk shows the South Yarmouth area and crimes reported in January

This crime map on police.uk shows the South Yarmouth area and crimes reported in January - Credit: police.gov.uk

The next nearest type of offences reported was antisocial behaviour with 43 reports in January and 1,684 over the same three-year period.

In north Yarmouth there were 92 violent and sex offences reported in January 2022 and for the three-year period the figure was 3,392 - just over the equivalent of three a day.

This crime map on police.uk shows the North Yarmouth area and crimes reported in January

This crime map on police.uk shows the North Yarmouth area and crimes reported in January - Credit: police.gov.uk

The second highest type of offence in January was public order with 29 reports.

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Over a three-year period the second highest number of reports was for antisocial behaviour, with 1,485 reports.

Norfolk police said a large proportion of the rise was associated with ‘behind closed doors’ crimes like domestic violence.

Police also said that not all reported crime ends up with police action or prosecutions.

The domestic abuse charity Leeway, which has an office in Great Yarmouth, said the murder of Sarah Everard had led to more people reporting incidents.

Superintendent Nathan Clark, District Commander for North Norfolk and Great Yarmouth, said:  “We continue to invest heavily in tackling violent and sexual crime and are currently working with partners across Norfolk in supporting the Government’s national ‘Enough’ to violence against women and girls campaign.

Supt Nathan Clark is now head of Great Yarmouth and North Norfolk District Police

Supt Nathan Clark is now head of Great Yarmouth and North Norfolk District Police - Credit: Jacob Massey

“We are committed to supporting victims, and as part of the national campaign posters condemning harassment in the street, unwanted touching and promoting how we can all help to reduce violence in Norfolk will appear on buses and in bus shelters in Great Yarmouth.

"Norfolk Constabulary will be offering further signposting and advice as part of this campaign, alongside our ongoing promotion of the Street Safe online tool, which is designed for members of the public to report where they feel unsafe.

"Whilst the figures for violent and sexual offences in Great Yarmouth and Gorleston appear higher in January 2022 compared to January 2021, crime figures for 2021 were significantly influenced by a year when social restrictions were in play as a result of Covid-19.

"Figures for all types of recorded crime in 2022 for the Great Yarmouth and Gorleston areas are in total actually lower than they were in 2020.

"Where we have seen a slight increase in reports of violent crime the actual number of crimes recorded in number, rather than the percentage of increase, is minimal. 

"We have confidence in our recording of these types of crime, and our figures reflect this.”

The domestic abuse charity Leeway has an office in Great Yarmouth.

Its chief executive, Mandy Proctor, said: “It is no surprise to see an increase in the number of violent offences being recorded, especially incidences of domestic abuse.

Mandy Proctor, chief executive of Leeway, the charity providing support to those experiencing domest

Mandy Proctor, chief executive of Leeway, the charity providing support to those experiencing domestic abuse. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Denise Bradley

"During the pandemic, we saw increases in the number of people that came forward to access support, especially with the instruction to stay at home escalating the abuse that many experienced.

"The lifting of restrictions has meant that many people are back in work and are possibly spending more time away from the perpetrator, which provides a greater opportunity to access support without alerting them.

“The Sarah Everard case has also had an impact as it has brought violence against women and girls into the spotlight and encouraged people to come forward if they do not feel safe."

Sarah Everard, 33, who left a friend's house in Clapham, south London, on Wednesday evening at around 9pm

Sarah Everard, 33, who left a friend's house in Clapham, south London, on Wednesday evening at around 9pm - Credit: PA Media

The Southtown and Cobholm area saw 504 violent and sex offences in 2021 reported and 40 were reported in January this year.

The Gorleston and Magdalen area saw 1,318 violent and sex offences reported in 2021 and 34 were reported in January.

In Broadland there were 106 fewer reports than the 3,300 in 2020.

In North Norfolk reports rose by 458 to 2,865 in 2021.

The Sue Lambert Trust

The Sue Lambert Trust is a Norfolk charity that supports people who have experienced sexual violence or abuse, including domestic abuse.

Its chief executive officer, Clive Evans, said: "We never fail to be shocked and distressed when police figures are released, revealing just how many sexual offences are happening within our county.

"Whilst we have seen an increase in people self-referring to us over the last two years, it is not possible to link these to current police reports. 

"That’s because, for some people, it can take years for them to feel in a place where they are ready to talk and seek out professional support." 

To access support, call 01603 622406, email info@suelamberttrust.org  or visit www.suelambertrust.org

You can also contact Leeway's domestic abuse hotline on 0300 561 0077.