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A medal worth £40,000 or an engraved sperm whale tooth - What caught your eye when Antiques Roadshow came to Cromer?

PUBLISHED: 21:07 03 February 2019 | UPDATED: 13:00 07 February 2019

Crowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Crowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Archant

It started with a promise of “sun, sea and sensational antiques” - so when presenter Fiona Bruce introduced the latest episode of Antiques Roadshow, already there was a lot of expectation.

Fiona Bruce during filming of the Antiques Roadshow at Cromer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYFiona Bruce during filming of the Antiques Roadshow at Cromer. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Filmed last summer on Cromer Pier, thousands flocked to the seaside resort to show off their items of interest.

One item in particular grasped the interest of expert John Foster, who described a 19th century, restored marine chronometer as “beautiful”.

Brought in by north Norfolk-based crime writer, Elizabeth Haynes, she explained that the item had been given to her by her father in 2013.

She said: “The reaction to it was great; lovely to have a marine item right beside the sea.

Crime writer Elizabeth Haynes. Picture: SUBMITTEDCrime writer Elizabeth Haynes. Picture: SUBMITTED

“I have kept the item safe since the show and I wouldn’t consider selling it as it’s our only family heirloom.

“The overall experience [being on the show] was great. What you don’t see is the incredibly efficient and hardworking teams of people behind the scenes who keep everything running smoothly - they were all so kind and helpful.

“And what a fantastic venue for the show - perfect weather and the pier showing Cromer at its glorious best.”

The item was valued by Mr Foster at between £2,000 and £3,000. He added: “What I love about these, is that they are always beautiful.”

Crowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYCrowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Also in the show, Eric Knowles was smittened with a beautiful Italian sculpture, which its owner claimed had lived in Lincolnshire at the family home for many years after previously being stored in a council flat in Peckham and under a table in Suffolk.

With the words “Milan 1883” engraved on it, Mr Knowles estimated it to be worth $20,000.

Next up was an early pen and ink drawing of a horse fair in Norwich by Sir Alfred Munnings, a former president of the Royal Academy of Arts. Dubbed “quite possibly the most famous of all horse painters” by expert Frances Christie, she valued it at between £1,500 and £2,000.

Two generous godmothers provided the next items - two spectacular gifts of jewellery.

Crowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYCrowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Expert, Geoffry Munn, valued the 20th century, Italian piece at £10,000. The second, an 19th century necklace, was estimated at £7,000.

A clock to mark the achievements of a man who helped build the lighthouse on Wolf Rock on the Isle of Scilly made an appearance and was valued by Alastair Chandler at £6,000.

And a glass ball filled with feathers - an early version of clay pigeon shooting - was a rare surviving find worth £150 according to Robert Tilney.

Next a Chinese vase bought from Brixton market in the 1930s was valued at £3,000 to £5,000 by ceramics expert, Lee Young.

Crowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYCrowds at Cromer for the filming of the Antiques Roadshow. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

While Mark Smith looked at a collection of memorabilia from a cook in the First World War, which included a recipe notebook outlining how to cook for hundreds of soldiers and successfully serve the food hot.

Mr Smith said “there are so many of these stories in cupboards” which make up some of the history of the Great War and said the items were in reality priceless, but on the open market could expect to fetch around £200 to £250.

A tiny blue Austin J40 pedal car won the crowd’s heart as Hilary Kay knelt down to take a closer look. Estimated to be around 60 years old, it was valued at around £2,000.

A drawing from the Peninsula War, which was discovered hanging in a hostel, was estimated to be worth up to £1,000 by Paul Atterbury and will be sold to help the homeless.

A 1780s dress described as a “real rarity” soon followed.

Given to the owner by her ex-mother-in-law, it had been worn to a fancy dress party - despite being at the height of fashion during its era.

Called a “good quality piece” it was estimated to be worth between £3,000 to £4,000.

A Doulton Lambeth Stoneware biscuit barrel made in 1880 by Hannah Barlow was valued at between £400 and £500 but had come down in value from £1,000 nearly 30 years ago.

Other items of interest included an engraved sperm whale’s tooth, a miniature 1920s crabbing boat, a small army gold medal worth £40,000, an original Lowry figure picture, and a silver communion cup made in 1666, which was the same year as the Great Fire of London, worth £10,000.

The story of Henry Blogg also featured on the show.

His distant relative John Davies, a former skipper of Cromer Lifboat who hung up his life jacket for the final time last year, was interviewed. A sixth generation lifeboat skipper, he explain how Henry Blogg was brought up by the Davies family.

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