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David's 'amazeing' talent

PUBLISHED: 12:22 21 August 2010 | UPDATED: 11:57 16 September 2010

SOME people have unusual hobbies in their spare time, but former weather forecaster David Kelf's is arguably more unusual than most.

For David, 64, designs labyrinths and is hoping to help Moorlands Primary School at Belton to unravel the mystery of how to create one of its own.

SOME people have unusual hobbies in their spare time, but former weather forecaster David Kelf's is arguably more unusual than most.

For David, 64, designs labyrinths and is hoping to help Moorlands Primary School at Belton to unravel the mystery of how to create one of its own.

Already a skilled painter, his interest in labyrinths stemmed from his time as an emissary at Schumacher

College at Dartington, Devon, which teaches sustainable development according to the works of the writer, EF Schumacher.

His biggest project was in 2005, when he designed a labyrinth at Seaton, Devon, to coincide with the 1,000th anniversary since the granting of the town's charter.

Seaton Town Council asked local people to contribute to the

celebrations, and Mr Kelf's comm-unity group proposed the labyrinth. The resulting puzzle, measuring 60ft across, took a year in the planning and six months in the making. Carved in the grass, the paths were made from rocks dating between 200m and 385m years old in the area known as the Jurassic Coast.

Mr Kelf, of Cliff Hill, Gorleston, also organises the Park Run in Gorleston.

He said he had spoken to the school secretary at Moorlands but had not heard whether the school would like his help with its labyrinth.

He added: “I am interested in them. I have been a school governor in the past and I know that school parties use the labyrinth in Devon that I made. It is like a maze, but it does not have any dead-ends. You just follow the path.”

Mr Kelf was featured in the Mercury in December 2004 through his work as a meteorologist and as a member of the Cloud Appreciation Society.


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