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Dismay as pet left to fend for itself

PUBLISHED: 16:51 07 August 2008 | UPDATED: 11:32 03 July 2010

DISTRESSED: The dog which, witnesses say, was abandoned in a garden near the centre of Great Yarmouth

DISTRESSED: The dog which, witnesses say, was abandoned in a garden near the centre of Great Yarmouth

OWNERS of a frightened dog were accused this week of abandoning their pet in Great Yarmouth.

Witnesses said the black labrador cross was left by a man and woman in a walled garden in George Street, close to the town centre, shortly after 9pm on Monday.

OWNERS of a frightened dog were accused this week of abandoning their pet in Great Yarmouth.

Witnesses said the black labrador cross was left by a man and woman in a walled garden in George Street, close to the town centre, shortly after 9pm on Monday. It took until just before 6pm the following day to retrieve the distressed animal, which had been too aggressive to approach.

The male dog had to be sedated before it was docile enough to be taken away to a kennel.

A couple were seen leaving the dog in the shrubbery by residents Violet and Michael Holder, who tried to comfort the animal.

Mrs Holder said: “I cannot describe how I feel about the people who have done this. It makes me very angry.

“The dog was barking all through the night. We tried giving it food and water but it was difficult getting close as he was too distressed.

Her husband added: “We ran out to look for the people who left the dog, but they had disappeared. I spoke to the police, who said it was not their responsibility, and was told it was too late for anyone from the council to deal with when I contacted them. The dog was in a stressed and frightened state, and I am cross it was left there so long.”

Environmental rangers and a council dog contractor arrived on the scene at about 11am the next day, but the dog was too dangerous to restrain. So sedatives were put in its food, and it was eventually enticed out after spending several hours in the thick bushes.

Borough council environmental health manager Peter Astle said: “This was not the way to treat the dog. It should have been taken to an animal charity or the RSPCA and not just abandoned.

“A child could easily have wandered into the garden and been bitten, but at least it was within a confined area.

“Once outside, the dog calmed down. It was very frightened just being left there to fend for

itself.

“The borough council does not have a dog warden and employs a contractor to deal with strays from 9am to 8pm. We do not have to provide a 24/7 service.”

Stray dogs have been the sole responsibility of the council since April, with the police only

dealing with dangerous dogs that are presenting a risk to the

public.

The dog will be kept in a kennel for the next seven days, and if it is not claimed by the owners it will be handed over to an animal rehoming charity.


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