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Electronics retailer to close

PUBLISHED: 09:51 30 January 2009 | UPDATED: 12:54 03 July 2010

THE dramatic slump in consumer spending that contributed to the collapse of Woolworths has claimed another victim just a few doors down in Great Yarmouth.

THE dramatic slump in consumer spending that contributed to the collapse of Woolworths has claimed another victim just a few doors down in Great Yarmouth.

The closing down sale signs were outside Curry's in Market Place this week, raising the spectre of another empty shop in the town centre.

But town centre manager Jonathan Newman stressed this week that it was not a reflection on Yarmouth but on the national situation.

He said: “If people were moving out of Yarmouth because they were not making money in Yarmouth that would be a different matter. Electronics have moved out of all town centres in recent years. Hughes may well pick up some trade but it does limit choice in the town centre which is what people want.

“It's all very well allowing out of town shopping in the good times but it is at times like this that it comes back to haunt us. It has been quite a quiet closure and another gap around the Market Place.”

Mr Newman added that footfall was reportedly up in the town centre, and 6pc higher than the national average.

The effects of the downturn were visible in Yarmouth, Mr Newman added but stressed that it had not been as badly affected as other larger towns.

Curry's in Great Yarmouth is understood to have traded well and was among those to survive a brutal round of cuts last year.

Electronics chain DSGi which owns Currys and PC World revealed a 10pc drop in quarterly sales earlier this month with bosses talking about a “challenging” 2009 and cutting costs to offset tough trading.

The stagnant housing market is said to have hit the sale of white goods like fridges and washing machines.

The company said in a statement: “Sadly, as part of the ongoing reviews of our high street store portfolio, the Currys.digital store in Great Yarmouth is closing in mid-February.

“Staff have been informed and during the consultation period we will be working with them to help them find alternative employment, preferably within the DSGi organisation.”

The spokesman added that the company announced last year its intention to close around 70 of its 170 high street stores in a gradual process as their leases came up for renewal. The Gapton Hall store was very much alive and kicking he stressed.


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