Familiar sights on Google

You might have missed the Google car as it caught your house on camera. Now anyone in the world can take a peep at your property. From Thursday, 360 degree pictures of almost every street in East Anglia went online, along with footage taken from more than 200,000 miles of Britain's roads.

You might have missed the Google car as it caught your house on camera. Now anyone in the world can take a peep at your property.

From Thursday, 360 degree pictures of almost every street in East Anglia went online, along with footage taken from more than 200,000 miles of Britain's roads.

In Norfolk alone, an estimated 6,000 miles of roads were covered by the camera car - a black Astra with a lollipop-like device on its roof.

Campaigners complained the service was an invasion of privacy, when it was rolled out across 10 cities, including Norwich, as a trial two years ago. France, Spain, Italy and the US already have national coverage.

But house-hunters and virtual sight-seers have found the service of more use than burglars. And Google insists faces and number plates will be automatically blurred, while anyone objecting to their house being featured can request its removal.

In King's Lynn, a familiar figure has been immortalised in the shape of one of the town's traffic wardens, who can clearly be recognised as he writes out a parking ticket.

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The faces of a couple crossing the road on Cromer sea front seem barely obscured, while in Burnham Market, a group sitting outside the Hoste Arms give the Google car a wave.

Parts of the Royal Estate are featured, including the tree-lined avenues which criss-cross Sandringham Park. But both Sandringham House and other properties residences used by members of the Royal family are not included.

They say a map is out of date as soon as it is published and some of the scenes pictured by the Google car, mostly during 2009, have already changed.

The Walks are no longer the home of King's Lynn FC, whose history ended in the High Court before Christmas. The town's Campbell's Tower will also soon be consigned to the history books, to make way for a new supermarket.

Some things will probably never change. Among the jumble of signs and advertisements which throng our roadsides, the camera car also captured a sign at the entrance to Wiveton village, warning: Slow You Down.