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Farmer makes his century goal

PUBLISHED: 16:43 22 May 2008 | UPDATED: 11:06 03 July 2010

WHEN George Farrow was 26 he was only given two hours to live, after being rushed to hospital with appendicitis.

But the farmer, who was born in Cantley, not only lived to tell the tale - he has lasted another 74 years and celebrated his 100th birthday at Old Rectory residential home in Acle on Wednesday.

WHEN George Farrow was 26 he was only given two hours to live, after being rushed to hospital with appendicitis.

But the farmer, who was born in Cantley, not only lived to tell the tale - he has lasted another 74 years and celebrated his 100th birthday at Old Rectory residential home in Acle on Wednesday.

Mr Farrow's condition was complicated further when his appendix burst and he developed peritonitis, which causes paralysis in the intestines and acute abdominal pain.

He spent six months in Beccles Cottage Hospital receiving treatment and at the time was one of few people to survive the condition.

But Mr Farrow's son-in-law Rodney Jones, 64, said despite the centenarian's brush with death he had generally been healthy and fit during his lifetime and would often walk 11 miles in a day as he ploughed an acre of his farm at The Ollands in Cantley.

“He always said that he wanted to make 100 and I think his determination has enabled him to reach that goal,” Mr Jones said.

Mr Farrow was born at The Ollands and went to school for a short time, but was already working his father's farm by the age of eight, which he eventually inherited.

Legend had it that The Ollands was haunted and Mr Jones said his father-in-law remembered doors being opened with no one present, objects moving unaided on the mantle shelf and even bed clothes being pulled off.

Another of his early memories was of having his tonsils removed and the kitchen table was the operating bed. Mr Farrow said: “They could not put me to sleep and it was horrible.”

He also spent some time working on his brother Will's farm, returning home to The Ollands at weekends on his motorbike. His other work involved ferrying sugar beet to Cantley Sugar Beet factory by lorry for use on surrounding farms.

He married his wife of 74 years Kath in October 1934.

Although the couple did not have a honeymoon, they spent two days on board the wherry 'Harthor' which was moored at Oulton Broad and belonged to the Colman family.

The couple went on to run farms at Gillingham, near Beccles, Toft Monks and finally New Barn Farm at Tunstead where they brought up their four children - Poppy Smith, 71, Paul Farrow, 67, Brenda Jones, 64 and Stephen Farrow, 51.

George Farrow retired aged 65 and moved to Lingwood before moving to the Old Rectory in September. He also has five grandchildren and was joined by 20 relatives as well as fellow Old Rectory residents for his party.

“He is a lovely old boy. A very quiet person. He did not interfere with anybody. He was a very amiable type of person,” Mr Jones said.


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