Film tracks railway memories

Miles Jermy A VANISHED railway has inspired two artists to record a short film in their home village of Belton.Glen Jamieson and Aaron Juneau are working together on the video that will feature in an exhibition at Nottingham and London.

Miles Jermy

A VANISHED railway has inspired two artists to record a short film in their home village of Belton.

Glen Jamieson and Aaron Juneau are working together on the video that will feature in an exhibition at Nottingham and London.

Both Glen and Aaron are fascinated by the railway line that ran through the village until the 1950s.


You may also want to watch:


The film, entitled The Loss of the Great Eastern Railway, features residents recalling their memories of the railway over images of the village.

Former Lynn Grove High School pupil Glen, 21, graduated earlier this year from De Montfort University in Leicester.

Most Read

It is the first project he has worked on with Aaron, 23, who studied

fine art at Nottingham Trent University.

Glen said: “There are still traces of the railway near Station Road and I remember playing along the old tracks when I was a boy.

“I suppose we find the history of the railway fascinating because it is an unfamiliar side of the place where we grew up.

“There will be a panorama of the village projected onto three screens with recollections from village residents, giving the viewer a feeling of viewing the place from inside a train carriage.”

“We have contacted some residents to record informal conversations with them regarding their memories of village life before the railway's closure. We are currently seeking more individuals to give their

insights and recollections.”

He added: “Though the form of our work relies strongly on the visual, we are only using sound recordings of the villagers, so those that might be camera shy need not worry.”

The railway came to the small, then Suffolk village, of Belton in 1859.

Known as the Great Eastern Railway and later re-named the London and North Eastern Railway, it was

the main line from Liverpool

Street, London, to Great Yarmouth.

Much to the residents' dismay the line through Belton was closed in 1959, returning the village to a state of relative isolation.

Glen and Aaron are planning to begin recording later this month for the exhibition that is being staged at the Bonnington Gallery, Nottingham in March.

The pair are among young

artists featured in the Fictions exhibition that is also due to

be shown at a London venue.

Work by Glen and Aaron is also among those featured in a visual art project due to be displayed on Great Yarmouth's big screens later this year.

Anyone interested in contributing to the film about Belton's lost railway should can call Glen on 07818455436 or e-mail glenjamieson1@hotmail.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter