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Fines threat in wheelie bins crackdown

PUBLISHED: 16:43 01 October 2009 | UPDATED: 15:11 03 July 2010

A CAMPAIGN cracking down on residents leaving their rubbish bins on the street gets up and running next week.

Promoted under the label “Is Your Bin a Dirty Stopout?”, 50,000 leaflets will be delivered to households in and around Great Yarmouth.

A CAMPAIGN cracking down on residents leaving their rubbish bins on the street gets up and running next week.

Promoted under the label “Is Your Bin a Dirty Stopout?”, 50,000 leaflets will be delivered to households in and around Great Yarmouth.

After the first month the borough's residents run the risk of a £80 fine if bins are left out on the street other than on designated collection days.

People not storing bins on their property have been blamed for an increase in the number of bins being stolen and set alight.

A doubling in contamination rates in recycled waste has also been made worse by passers-by dropping rubbish in other people's bins.

The increase, from seven per cent in 2007 to 13.8pc this year, means there is less money to invest in waste services in the borough.

However, the message already appears to be getting across in South Yarmouth with an environmental action day last week finding contamination in just three green re-cycling bins.

The campaign has been organised by the borough council with the police and refuse collection providers GYBS.

Leaflets are also being distributed at the same time urging people to recycle their plastic bottles.

Great Yarmouth waste and re-cycling communication officer Lisa Crook said: “We would like to remind residents not to put in bottle tops, margarine tubs, ice cream tubs, general food packaging and carrier bags in their green bins.

“Putting the wrong plastic in your recycling bin can cause damage to the sorting process and can mean that whole loads of waste destined for recycling could be rejected.

“We are of course continuing to recycle card, paper and cans through the kerbside system and would like to congratulate people on their effective use of the bring banks for glass bottles, cans, clothing and shoes.”

The public can also use two battery banks for household battery recycling that have recently been installed at the Town Hall and Maltings House.

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