Search

Meet Waggy the wagtail - the friendly bird that's adopted a refuse tip

PUBLISHED: 17:08 16 May 2019 | UPDATED: 17:08 16 May 2019

Waggy the friendly wagtail visiting the Caister Recycling Centre. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Waggy the friendly wagtail visiting the Caister Recycling Centre. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Copyright: Archant 2019

When staff turn up for work at one of the county's recycling centres, there is always one early bird reporting for duty and eager to get on with the day.

Recycling advisor John Benton with Waggy the wagtail who prefers a gloved hand Picture: James UttingRecycling advisor John Benton with Waggy the wagtail who prefers a gloved hand Picture: James Utting

In fact so diligent is Waggy the pied wagtail he almost never leaves the site in Pump Lane, Caister, where he has become a firm favourite with staff and visitors enjoying a close-up encounter as they empty their cars of rubbish.

Recycling advisor John Benton said: "He is the first animal I have ever spoken to.

"He is just always close to us, all the time.

"He will sit on my shoulder and he chirps back to me."

Paul Ellis, left, lead advisor at the Caister Recycling Centre, and John Benton, recycling advisor, with the bird water station and meal worms for Waggy the friendly wagtail which regularly visits. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYPaul Ellis, left, lead advisor at the Caister Recycling Centre, and John Benton, recycling advisor, with the bird water station and meal worms for Waggy the friendly wagtail which regularly visits. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Waggy first started showing an interest in joining the team in around September, when he seemed to welcome them as they opened up.

Soon they began buying special breakfast food and within weeks he was eating out of their hands.

A bird bath that had been dropped off was quickly commandeered and established as his special spot, where meal worms can be soaked to the perfect consistency, just how he likes them.

You may also want to watch:

Lead advisor Paul Ellis said the site was a hub for wildlife, with deer, badgers and foxes among the regular visitors.

But Waggy is the only one that has wormed his way into everyone's affections - and become something of a local celebrity.

Attracted to the green waste bins because of all the insects contained within, he is also partial to a spider on a windscreen wiper.

His fondness for an eight-legged lunch often sees him flit around the cars pecking the windows - apparently also enjoying his own reflection.

Having the run of site also means popping into the office to mingle with the all-male team of workers he, or she, has adopted.

Mr Benton said there had been two birds flying around at one point and it was possible Waggy had a family towards the water treatment works.

"We have got to look after him because he does more hours than anyone else. He is always here before us and after we leave."

Mr Ellis added: "It is a nice element to the day. It is not a burden and nice to see.

"We don't really want him to get too tame but he knows what side his bread is buttered on.

"There is a constant supply of food and to see him catch a fly is like watching the Red Arrows, so acrobatic."

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Great Yarmouth Mercury

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists