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Low public support for cameras and reduced speed limit on Acle Straight according to transport plan

PUBLISHED: 18:01 21 February 2019 | UPDATED: 18:01 21 February 2019

There is low support for a reduced speed limit and cameras on the A47 Acle Straight, according to a report on the Great Yarmouth tranport strategy. Picture: Nick Butcher

There is low support for a reduced speed limit and cameras on the A47 Acle Straight, according to a report on the Great Yarmouth tranport strategy. Picture: Nick Butcher

Archant © 2017

Transport bosses have found little to no support for the introduction of cameras and a reduced speed limit along the Acle Straight, after it was considered - and quickly dropped - as one way to improve transport in Great Yarmouth.

Cllr Trevor Wainwright, David Glason, Cllr Adrian Myers, Cllr Chris Walsh and Cllr Graham Plant with a Campaign poster to see the A47 dualled along the Acle Straight.
Picture: Nick ButcherCllr Trevor Wainwright, David Glason, Cllr Adrian Myers, Cllr Chris Walsh and Cllr Graham Plant with a Campaign poster to see the A47 dualled along the Acle Straight. Picture: Nick Butcher

The town’s transport strategy, developed by Great Yarmouth Borough Council and Norfolk County Council, includes a list of schemes to address problems faced by motorists and commuters in the town.

Some 70 schemes to improve road, rail, bus and cycling in the town have made the next phase of the strategy, which will entail a four-week public consultation in March.

MORE: Third river crossing, rail improvements and A47 dualling on table for Great Yarmouth transport vision

But around 26 potential projects had been sifted out of the process for reasons such as unrealistic deliverability, timescale, lack of support and low demand.

MORE: Dockless bikes and continuous cycle network ruled out of Great Yarmouth transport plan

This includes the prospect of introducing a reduced speed limit and cameras on the A47 Acle Straight - between Acle and Great Yarmouth - which was dismissed during the initial sift and has not made the next phase of the strategy.

Transport bosses have stated in a strategy report this was due to low public acceptability, low political support and the requirement for a Highways England “buy-in”.

The single carriageway is notorious for the numerous accidents - including fatalities - that have happened along the eight-mile stretch of road and snarl-ups in the Great Yarmouth direction during rush hour.

Martin Wilby, Norfolk County Council and chairman of the A47 Alliance, speaks at the meeting at King's Lynn for the A47 Dualling campaign. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYMartin Wilby, Norfolk County Council and chairman of the A47 Alliance, speaks at the meeting at King's Lynn for the A47 Dualling campaign. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

One scheme to remedy this has been taken forward to the strategy - plans to dual the Acle Straight, which forms part of Highways England’s 2015-2020 investment strategy for improvement works on the A47 corridor.

It has been categorised in the strategy report as a medium term plan which could take between three to 10 years to deliver.

Although some could argue the road will be built at snail’s pace, members of campaign group A47 Alliance heard work on dualling the Acle Straight could begin in 2023.

A five year study is under way which will determine whether the endangered little whirlpool ramshorn snail found in the ditches along the stretch of road could be relocated elsewhere.

But Alliance chairman Martin Wilby said this would not make or break the decision to include the dualling of the Acle Straight in the next funding announcement, which is likely to be made later this year.

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