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Hair loss mystery

PUBLISHED: 17:06 17 January 2008 | UPDATED: 10:18 03 July 2010

Miles Jermy

A MARTHAM family is suffering from a mysterious condition which is causing their hair to fall out.

Mum Nicola Williams, partner Simon Egerton and her two children have all experienced unexplained hair loss since moving into their Bensley Road home almost two years ago.

A MARTHAM family is suffering from a mysterious condition which is causing their hair to fall out.

Mum Nicola Williams, partner Simon Egerton and her two children have all experienced unexplained hair loss since moving into their Bensley Road home almost two years ago.

Medical tests have not identified the cause of the problem, but Ms Williams, 41, has blamed the water supply.

She said: “The water stinks of chlorine even when it has been boiled and it is the only thing I can think of that could be causing this.

“When I wash my hair, it comes out in clumps and I can feel it literally breaking off in my hands. I have a big bald patch at the back of my head, which is very upsetting.

“My partner has also lost a lot of hair - he is only 35 but looks like a 50 year old - and my three-year-old daughter Chloe pulls it out in her hands. Our GP has told us it is not a medical condition and my hair follicles are still there, so it should re-grow.”

The family started suffering hair loss, mild skin irritation and bouts of diarrhoea shortly after moving to the council house in 2006.

Detailed analysis carried out on the water last November found it was safe to drink, but detected a mild chlorine odour.

A statement from supplier Anglian Water said: “The level of chlorine at different customers' taps will vary due to a number of factors, including the temperature of the water and level of water usage. Such tastes and orders arise when the chlorine in the mains reacts with certain rubber or plastic compounds, such as those found in kettles, tap washers and hoses. When drinking water is boiled, the process of heating drives off the chlorine - if the tastes and odours persist, they do not originate from the mains water.”

Director of community housing at Great Yarmouth Borough Council, Denis Gilbert, told the Mercury that nothing was found to be wrong with the water system during an inspection at the house.

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