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'He's one to watch'

PUBLISHED: 15:35 08 May 2008 | UPDATED: 11:02 03 July 2010

WHEN Jarone Macklin-Page was taken into care at 14 and expelled from school, he thought he would never fulfil his dream of becoming an actor.

But after five years of hard work and dedication, the 19-year-old is packing his bags and moving to London to study at one of Britain's most prestigious theatre schools.

WHEN Jarone Macklin-Page was taken into care at 14 and expelled from school, he thought he would never fulfil his dream of becoming an actor.

But after five years of hard work and dedication, the 19-year-old is packing his bags and moving to London to study at one of Britain's most prestigious theatre schools.

After a difficult time at home, Jarone moved into the Break children's home in Mundesley aged 14. By the age of 15 he had been expelled from school and it looked like his life was spiralling out of control.

He did not have the commitment to stick at any training courses and was struggling with dyslexia. After trying his hand at horticulture and building, he managed to secure a place on Great Yarmouth College's performing arts course.

For the last three years he has been studying for a BTEC national diploma in performing arts and now, aged 19, he has won a coveted place at the Italia Conti theatre school in London where famous names including X-Factor winner Leona Lewis, actress Bonnie Langford and playwright Noel Coward have trained.

The school made him an unconditional offer to start his BA (Hons) acting degree course in September after an audition earlier this year.

Jarone said when he moved into a children's home at 14, he thought it was the worst thing that could happen. “Now I realise it was the best because it has made me a stronger person and a more determined person to make things happen for myself.

“I am the sort of person who learns and watches what is going on around me. I learned so much from the staff in the children's home, who were fantastic. Without my background, my acting career probably would not be as advanced as it is.

“I want people to see that if you do have an underprivileged background, it doesn't have to mean a disability in life. I dream of winning an Oscar and giving a speech about coming from a background like mine to inspire other people.”

College vice-principal Daphne King said: “I've watched Jarone's progress with a real sense of pride. It's been great to watch him and realise that he has been learning to uncover a great acting talent. He has worked hard and really deserves this place. He'll be someone to watch out for in the future.”


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