'I felt silly' - woman, 25, urges people to see a GP after cancer diagnosis

Khia Pallett from Martham is warning other young women about breast cancer

Khia Pallett, from Martham, is urging women of all ages to always get checked if they have any concerns after being diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 25. - Credit: supplied by Khia Pallett

A 25-year-old who was just weeks away from getting married, moving house and starting a family has put her life on hold after a bombshell cancer diagnosis.

Khia Pallett, from Martham, had her future planned out when she was handed the devastating news that a lump in her breast was malignant and that she would need chemotherapy and surgery.

Khia Pallett from Martham who has breast cancer

Khia Pallett with her partner Steven Balls. The couple's wedding plans have been put on hold following the 25 year old's cancer diagnosis. - Credit: supplied by Khia Pallett

The nursery practitioner said she had found the lump around two months before but had told herself she was "being silly" by bothering the doctor at her age.

However, as the weeks went by and the lump grew and changed, she became more concerned and was diagnosed with cancer two weeks after she visited her GP.

Now she is keen to impress on women of any age, and particularly those in the younger age group, that it could be them - and to get any changes checked.

"It was really, really shocking at first," she said.

"You do not ever expect it to be you. Even with the lump I felt really silly going to the doctors. If you find anything go and get it checked."

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She is having chemotherapy every three weeks and has four more rounds to go.

Miss Pallett said she was due to marry her partner of more than three years Steven Balls in July. Their house was also being put on the market the day they were handed the cancer news.

They had expected to be trying for a baby, but instead she had to freeze her eggs because the treatment will make her infertile.

But, having cancelled the wedding meant there was something to look forward to once the worst was over, she added.

Miss Pallett, a nursery practitioner at Tree Tops Nursery at Martham Academy, said she had been overwhelmed by the support from friends and family who were all helping to "keep things normal".

A fun day has been organised for cancer research at Martham Sports and Social Club on September 18 from 1pm until late featuring family fun and games, live music and raffle.

Fundraising for Khia Pallett in Great Yarmouth

Sofia and Lydia Carter are fundraising for their nursery school teacher who has been diagnosed with breast cancer at 25. The girls completed a tour of Great Yarmouth's Snail Trail as part of their challenge to cycle 100 miles by September 18 when there is a fundraising event in Martham. - Credit: Simon Carter

Meanwhile two former pupils, sisters Sofia, aged nine, and seven-year-old Lydia Carter from West Somerton, are cycling 100 miles for Miss Pallett, in a bid to raise money for flowers, chocolates and treats to giver her a lift.

Overwhelmed by support they have now upped their target to £200.

To sponsor them search 100 Miles for Khia on Facebook.

Friends are also taking on the Pretty Muddy Race for Life and can be sponsored by searching Muddy Martham.

Signs of breast cancer

According to the NHS signs to look out for are:

  • A new lump or area of thickened tissue in either breast that was not there before
  • A change in the size or shape of one or both breasts
  • A discharge of fluid from either nipple
  • A lump or swelling in either of your armpits
  • A change in the look or feel of your skin, such as puckering or dimpling, a rash or redness
  • A rash (like eczema), crusting, scaly or itchy skin or redness on or around your nipple
  • A change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken into your breast
  • Most breast lumps are not cancerous, but they should be checked by a doctor.

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