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Hospital widens search for nurses

PUBLISHED: 10:38 23 July 2009 | UPDATED: 14:28 03 July 2010

A NORFOLK hospital has launched a £200,000 recruitment drive to overcome a staff shortage of vital nurses due its coastal location.

Described as the Cornwall effect, the geographical position of the James Paget University Hospital, in Gorleston, has seen it struggle to recruit enough registered nurses for its wards.

A NORFOLK hospital has launched a £200,000 recruitment drive to overcome a staff shortage of vital nurses due its coastal location.

Described as the Cornwall effect, the geographical position of the James Paget University Hospital, in Gorleston, has seen it struggle to recruit enough registered nurses for its wards.

To help to combat the shortfall of up to 70 registered nurses out of 1,165 nursing and midwifery staff, the JPH has launched a £200,000 Remarkable People Work At recruitment drive.

The hospital is placing new eye catching advertisement in health publications to attract people to apply to work at the hospital.

The drive to recruit and retain registered nurses will also see the JPH advertise in Ireland and across Europe, improve staff rosters, interview all leaving nurses and create the post of assistant practitioner.

Bosses are also confident that once people are recruited they will stay on for the long term as a hospital surveys show the JPH is a good place to work at.

Kirk Lower, director of human resources and organisational development, described the nurse shortage as the Cornwall effect.

“The problem is our geographical position. People don't want to travel to Yarmouth and Lowestoft and relocate.”

The Remarkable People Work At campaign will use photographs of real staff to recruit across the hospital 3,000 strong workforce.

JPH chief executive Wendy Slaney said: “The main aim is to get people's attention in the first place and make them aware of us and then show them the many benefits of living and working here.”

The hospital pointed out that the shortfall of registered nurses is not affecting the treatment of any patients.


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