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Jetty Boys accused of risking lives

PUBLISHED: 10:35 27 August 2010 | UPDATED: 11:57 16 September 2010

BOY racers have been accused this week of putting lives at risk at Great Yarmouth Pleasure Beach.

The irresponsible antics of a group of the so-called Jetty Boys could cause a serious accident, according to the tourist attraction's managing director Albert Jones.

BOY racers have been accused this week of putting lives at risk at Great Yarmouth Pleasure Beach.

The irresponsible antics of a group of the so-called Jetty Boys could cause a serious accident, according to the tourist attraction's managing director Albert Jones.

Mr Jones told the Mercury that lasers have been shone into the eyes of staff, and people shot at with BB guns while on rides.

Paint ball pellets are also regularly fired at the rollercoaster and bottles of urine thrown over the fence.

Earlier this month a smoke bomb was thrown into the Pleasure Beach, prompting a full-scale fire alert. “I could not contact my nightwatchman and feared he was trapped and thought the rollercoaster was on fire,” said Mr Jones.

“Youths have also broken in and run up and down the rollercoaster, they just don't realise how dangerous it is.

“There have been complaints from a number of staff that laser lights have been shone in their eyes. A security guard was sent out to investigate and it happened to him too.

“The police were called, but it took 25 minutes for them to arrive and there was only one guy left sitting in the car when they got there.”

He added: “There are mass gatherings of Jetty Boys on Marine Parade, they even bring up chairs and drink alcohol. Earlier this month there were about 100 cars from the model village to Main Cross Road. There are double or treble the number of cars than a few years ago.”

On Wednesday, Mr Jones hosted a meeting about the boy racers who have been plaguing the lives of seafront residents for 20 years.

Large groups of youngsters regularly congregate on the seafront at night speeding, driving dangerously and playing loud music.

More than 40 local people attended the meeting to question senior police officers about the issue.

Organiser Sheena Mcvain, who lives on South Beach Parade, said: “There have been big problems recently with anti-social behaviour. The music is loud enough to rattle windows; there is shouting, screaming and a 'Mexican wave' of headlights being switched on and off.

“They drive so fast it is not possible to write down their registration numbers. The police have been issuing on-the-spot fines for anti-social behaviour and that has helped reduce the disturbances.”

Priorities set for dealing with the problem included CCTV cameras, speed bumps, no parking zones and switching off street lights after 11pm.

Speaking at the meeting Supt Jim Smerdon said: “We are working hard to solve this problem that has been a big issue for the last 20 years.

“We have rattled a few cages and there is only a small group of offenders causing the nuisance.

“I believe we are now getting to the tipping point and close to breaking the problem if the police and residents can work together.”


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