Jetty decision postponed

A decision about the future of Great Yarmouth's threatened jetty made famous by Lord Nelson has been postponed for at least three months because the seafront structure may be listed by English Heritage.

A decision about the future of Great Yarmouth's threatened jetty made famous by Lord Nelson has been postponed for at least three months because the seafront structure may be listed by English Heritage.

Yarmouth Borough Council was due to vote on demolishing the run down jetty on February 16 as it says it cannot afford the �350,000 needed to restore it.

However the development control committee decision has been put back at last three months after its chairman Charles Reynolds said it would be inappropriate to discuss ripping it down until the outcome of an English Heritage review is known.

Officials from English Heritage will be studying the jetty on February 8 and 9 to see if it should be listed so it can be saved.


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If it is listed it could possibly be restored by funds raised by pro-jetty campaigners.

It is thought that it will take up to three months before English Heritage decides if the jetty should be listed because of its historical importance.

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In 1801 Lord Admiral Nelson left from the jetty to take part in the battle of Copenhagen and landed there victorious afterwards.

Research has also revealed that the jetty could have played a role in seeing off the Spanish Armada.

English Heritage was asked to carry out the listing study by the secretary of the Yarmouth Archaeological Society Margaret Gooch.

The chairman of the society Andrew Fakes said: “We welcome the postponement of next month's planning meeting.

“If the jetty is saved we hope that national funds will become available to fund its restoration.”

The Yarmouth Archaeological Society has been supported in its quest to save the jetty by the 1805 Society, the Nelson Society and the National Piers Association.

Explaining the postponement of his committee's jetty decision Mr Reynolds said: “It would be quite improper to consider any application for the jetty while English Heritage might be looking at listing the structure.

“This process could take two to three months and I think it only correct that the council looks at its options again later in the year in the light of any decision taken by English Heritage.

“It will also give interested parties time to formulate any constructive and practical ideas they might have and give them to the council.”

A spokeswoman for English Heritage said: “We understand that many people in the local community feel strongly about the site and we will be carrying out a full and detailed assessment of the jetty, taking into account all relevant information.

“Our recommendation will then be sent to the Secretary of State, who will make the final decision. English Heritage follows strict criteria when making assessments for listing and recommendations are based on national, architectural and historical interest.”

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