Search

JPH boss steps down for new role

PUBLISHED: 11:45 17 April 2009 | UPDATED: 13:42 03 July 2010

A hospital chief executive who started his job just as a deadly infection contributed to the deaths of 18 patients has left.

Adrian Pennington took up the reins of the James Paget University Hospital, Gorleston, at the height of an outbreak of the superbug C diff in April 2007.

A hospital chief executive who started his job just as a deadly infection contributed to the deaths of 18 patients has left.

Adrian Pennington took up the reins of the James Paget University Hospital, Gorleston, at the height of an outbreak of the superbug C diff in April 2007.

He stepped down as chief executive on Wednesday to join the East of England Strategic Health Authority.

During the last two years Mr Pennington oversaw a nationally renowned infection prevention and control programme and helped secure multi million pound investment schemes.

As well as tackling the C diff outbreak, Mr Pennington had to deal with the aftermath of the conviction of Dr Rashid Sandhu for sexually assaulting a young female patient.

Mr Pennington said: “It is with much sadness that I leave the JPH. I have enjoyed my time leading this organisation and the brilliant and committed people who work in it.

“I am pleased with our progress as a foundation trust, the commitment to invest heavily in new facilities and services and being one of the few trusts in the country to be awarded a double excellent grade from the HealthCare Commission.”

In his new role of project director at the strategic health authority Mr Pennington will be tasked with improving the quality of services across the region.

John Hemming, chairman of the JPH, said: “We would to thank Adrian for his contribution to the trust over the last two years. During that time we have made notable progress as a foundation trust and made significant progress in infection prevention and control.”

The new chief executive of the JPH for the next year is Wendy Slaney, the trust's former medical director. She said: “The next 12 months will be challenging and exciting for the trust as we take forward further quality improvements to our services.”


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Great Yarmouth Mercury. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Great Yarmouth Mercury