Life expectancy variations

NORFOLK and Suffolk still have big gaps in life expectancy and health according to where you live. Men in South Norfolk can expect to live three years longer than men in Yarmouth, with early deaths from heart disease and stroke causing most of the differences.

NORFOLK and Suffolk still have big gaps in life expectancy and health according to where you live.

Men in South Norfolk can expect to live three years longer than men in Yarmouth, with early deaths from heart disease and stroke causing most of the differences.

Even within the borough of Yarmouth, life expectancy varies by eight years for men between the most deprived and least deprived areas.

The new health profiles, published by the Association of Public Health Observatories for every district and county, show that an estimated 100 people die from winter cold in Yarmouth each year - one of the worst rates in the country. It is the first time winter deaths have been included in the profile.

King's Lynn and West Norfolk has one of the worst rates of infant mortality in the country.

In general the health of Norfolk people is better than the England average. Death rates have improved over the last 10 years, including those caused by cancer, heart disease and smoke. But its rates of injury and death in road accidents are significantly worse than average, putting it in the worst 25pc in the country with 510 casualties a year.

Most Read

The most unhealthy part of the county is Yarmouth, although parts of Thetford, King's Lynn and Norwich also have problems of deprivation and related poor health.

Yarmouth has above-average numbers of adults on incapacity benefit for mental illness, and higher than average rates of drug misuse, deprivation and diabetes.

The rates of teenage pregnancy, breast feeding and physical activity in children at school are significantly worse than the national average. But it does better than average on binge drinking and numbers of road injuries and deaths.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter