Search

Local woman remembered

PUBLISHED: 18:05 15 May 2008 | UPDATED: 11:04 03 July 2010

THE 10-year anniversary of the death of a local woman has been poignantly marked with the charity founded in her memory funding two treatment rooms at the Palliative Care East centre.

THE 10-year anniversary of the death of a local woman has been poignantly marked with the charity founded in her memory funding two treatment rooms at the Palliative Care East centre.

Since its launch in 2000 the Louise Hamilton Cancer Help Centre Trust has been working with the James Paget with the combined goal of improving care and treatment of patients, their carers and families whose lives are affected by incurable diseases.

Yesterday, marked the 10th anniversary of Louise's death and Roberta Lovick, Louise's mother and trust founder, said it felt “poignant” that the trust was announcing it would fund two treatment rooms named after Louise in the Palliative Care East centre, which will be built in the ground of the James Paget University Hospital.

She said: “As a trust we are pleased that patients and carers will receive much needed help sooner than anticipated.

“Through personal involve-ment and voluntary work both locally and nationally with Macmillan Cancer Support I realise the urgent need for such a centre, a facility which in my view cannot come soon enough.”

Some time later after the trust was launched, Mrs Lovick met Dr Patrick Blossfeldt, lead consultant in palliative care at the James Paget, and was able to explain the trust's goals.

She said: “I asked that if at some point in the future the hospital should have a similar idea that we could work together for the good of patients, carers and their families.”

Then in 2006, the hospital's £1.5m Palliative Care East public appeal was launched. So far more than £500,000 has been raised with pledges and donations.

Mrs Lovick said: “I was delighted when plans for Palliative Care East were divulged because it gave us the chance to be involved from the very beginning.

“Our aims are to give patients the best possible care and it seems fitting that we should work together towards this goal.”

Louise died of breast cancer in 1998 at the age of 28.

Mrs Lovick added her thanks to the devoted trustees and supporters of the trust which will continue to fundraise to offer a bursary award scheme to cancer patients.

The bursaries are aimed at patients on low incomes to allow them to receive complementary treatments.

Anyone wishing to apply for a bursary or donate to the Louise Hamilton Cancer Help Centre Trust should call 01692 670076.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Great Yarmouth Mercury. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Great Yarmouth Mercury