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Long-term effects of brother's death

PUBLISHED: 09:33 14 May 2008 | UPDATED: 11:04 03 July 2010

THE brother of a Norfolk man killed in the 2004 Tsunami disaster turned to alcohol and became violent because of his sibling's tragic death, a court heard yesterday.

THE brother of a Norfolk man killed in the 2004 Tsunami disaster turned to alcohol and became violent because of his sibling's tragic death, a court heard yesterday.

James Hurren, from Caister, died in the Asian Boxing Day Tsunami after a wall of water smashed into the island of Phi Phi off Thailand.

Mr Hurren was only 22 when he died and his devastated father, Dale Hurren, had to identify his body just by his clothes and tattoos.

Yesterday his younger brother, Thomas Hurren, admitted to using threatening behaviour towards a teenage girl in Yarmouth's Rudeys bar.

Yarmouth magistrates court heard that Hurren, 20, of Avenue Road, Gorleston, had never got over the death of his brother and resorted to drinking.

His drinking had fuelled his anger when he struck out at the teenage girl in the early hours of April 12 and caused her to fear that unlawful violence would be used towards her.

Gary Starling, prosecuting, said: “She had gone out with friends during the evening and she said that she had consumed four or five Vodka and Cokes.

“She said that she felt tipsy but in control of what she was doing. She had seen Hurren had just said 'Hello.' But she alleges that later he poured a glass of drink over her.

“He was then asked to leave but she said that around 2.50am she had asked him to be readmitted. Then he had smacked her in the mouth. She said it felt painful and blood was pouring out.”

Rob Pollington, in mitigation, said that the girl concerned had been over affectionate towards Hurren.

Mr Pollington said: “She had provoked him and he had not initially risen to the bait.

“He has admitted what he's done and he is genuinely horrified by his behaviour. He struck out and knocked her over but she got up and carried on with the altercation.”

Mr Pollington said that Hurren he had never got over his brother's death and had sometimes turned to alcohol and used his fists under the influence.

He said: “I think he understands where the problem lies. He currently works as a labourer and has recently completed a course for him to work offshore.

Chairman of the Bench Ken Barnes told Hurren: “It has disturbed us as this was a violent act towards a young woman.”

The case was adjourned until June 4 for reports


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