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Bid to build 200 houses in seaside village recommended for approval

PUBLISHED: 15:06 12 October 2020 | UPDATED: 12:24 15 October 2020

Approximate location of planned development of 200 houses in Hopton. Picture: Google Maps.

Approximate location of planned development of 200 houses in Hopton. Picture: Google Maps.

Archant

A bid to build 200 houses in a seaside village has taken another step forward after planners recommended its approval - despite concerns over noise and pollution from the nearby A47.

Land off Lowestoft Road in Hopton, where Norfolk County Council will build 200 houses. Picture: Google Maps.Land off Lowestoft Road in Hopton, where Norfolk County Council will build 200 houses. Picture: Google Maps.

The scheme, on land east of Lowestoft Road in Hopton, already has outline planning permission, granted two years ago by Great Yarmouth Borough Council.

The proposal is up for discussion on Wednesday (October 14) at a meeting of the council’s development control committee.

Developers, Lovell Partnership Ltd, are applying for approval of reserved matters including the appearance, layout, scale and landscaping of the nine-hectare site.

The estate would include 176 houses, 20 bungalows and four flats, with access from two points on Lowestoft Road.

A report to the committee states that an environmental health officer has objected to the proposal over concerns about noise and pollution from the highway.

According to the officer, houses on the western boundary of the site would need to keep their windows shut to meet the requirements of the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) noise level standards deemed to ensure the health of occupants.

The report also mentions a noise survey conducted during consideration of the proposal which found that acoustic barriers would not be fully effective.

“The applicant has considered roadside barriers but the acoustic work showed that these would have to be over two storeys high to prevent flanking noise effects to the nearest residences,” the report says.

Despite these misgivings, planning officers have said there are “practical means to address the issues objected to and that the material balance of delivering homes in a sustainable location outweighs those concerns”.

For example, ventilation could be achieved through ducted systems instead of windows, the report states.

The report suggests to councillors that the issue for debate is whether it would be reasonable to “leave undeveloped a strip on the west side of the site where noise can be controlled”.

Other objectors, including Hopton parish council and neighbours to the site, have flagged up uncertainty over an additional bus service, contaminated land as public open space and more issues with dogs on the nearby playing field.

A local horse-riding stable raised concerns regarding construction disturbance and men in personal protective equipment (PPE) as being “frightening to horses”.

The planners recommend permitting the bid with conditions requiring a planting scheme and the provision of electric vehicle charging in the common parking areas,

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