Market traders farewell to Harry

ABOUT 100 people stood in silence in Great Yarmouth Market Place to bid fond farewell to a market trader who died recently.Dignitaries, including borough mayor Tony Smith, joined other market traders, friends, relatives and even customers to pay tribute on Saturday to Harry Kern, who died earlier this month aged 83.

ABOUT 100 people stood in silence in Great Yarmouth Market Place to bid fond farewell to a market trader who died recently.

Dignitaries, including borough mayor Tony Smith, joined other market traders, friends, relatives and even customers to pay tribute on Saturday to Harry Kern, who died earlier this month aged 83. He was the town's second-longest-serving market trader.

Mr Smith saluted Harry as one of the market's characters and spoke of his catchphrases and how he used to call him an “infantryman” because of his tall build.

Harry's daughter, Gloria Barber, 53, travelling from her home at High Wycombe for the special service outside Harry's stall and read a poem,


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The gathering then adjourned to the Market Tavern for a buffet and to toast Harry's life.

Son Mark said: “It was really nice. A lot of people went to the Market Tavern afterwards, and we were surprised by just how many of the people in there had come for the service.”

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Harry, who was originally from the East End of London, opened his stall selling ironing board covers, insoles for shoes and foam in 1960 and continued serving customers until March 13, when he died

of a heart attack shortly after completing a day's trading.

Mark said his dad, who lived with his widow Patricia in Yarmouth Road, Caister, was always present on Wednesday and Saturday market days because he loved having his stall. He added: “He had many great memories of being involved with the public down at the stall, especially in the summertime with the holidaymakers, and he liked to have a joke with the traders.

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