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Musicians' marriage hits the right note

PUBLISHED: 15:36 08 May 2008 | UPDATED: 11:02 03 July 2010

THERE was only one thing missing from a marriage to match two musicians - the music.

And with no one to push the pedals of the organ or sing the choral pieces or solos the delayed ceremony was in the hands of the aptly named the Rev Dan Waite.

THERE was only one thing missing from a marriage to match two musicians - the music.

And with no one to push the pedals of the organ or sing the choral pieces or solos the delayed ceremony was in the hands of the aptly named the Rev Dan Waite.

Bride Kay Dickson's musical roots were, like her, born in the borough, where her parents, John and Sue Dickson, of Cliff Hill, Gorleston, loved and played music.

The former Cliff Park High School pupil's career took her to a teaching post at the London school where Tony Blair's children attended and where she met well-known professional accompanist Jonathan Beatty, son of Adrian and Valerie Beatty, of Rishangles Hall, Suffolk.

An enthusiastic supporter of the St Andrew's Competitive Festival, it was fitting the 36-year-old returned to St Andrew's Church, Gorleston, to take her wedding vows.

Many of the guests, including those who were to provide the music, came from London, among them Stephen Disley, organist at Southwark Cathedral, directors of music from the Oratory and from James Allen Girls' School where Kay now teaches, prize-winning soloist Katherine Broderick and members of the BBC Singers.

However, it was not the bride who was late. A major accident closed the A14 for hours and many of the guests were hopelessly stuck.

The starting time for the service came and went with no sign of the performers, who were still stationary some 75 miles away. The prospect of the musical wedding of the year without music became an ever-increasing reality.

As stress levels mounted the day was saved by the vicar, Mr Waite, who agreed to delay the start of the service, and tea and coffee was served in the Chapter House. Mr Dickson said a party spirit developed and everyone got to know each other.

Meanwhile back on the A14 resourcefulness came to the fore. One car was guided back down the hard shoulder to a slip road. Other cars were able to exit through a gate behind a filling station which gave access to a farm track which bypassed the accident.

Finally the message was relayed that the organist's car was turning into the church grounds.

Two hours late and to the thunderous triumphant sound of the organ Kay, in her ivory pearl studded dress with puddle train, walked down the aisle on her father's arm attended by bridesmaid nieces Ellen Coupar, five, also in ivory and Alexandra Southgate, 16 in grape.

The reception was held at Caistor Hall Hotel, Caistor St Edmund.


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