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New crossing patrol in Caister

PUBLISHED: 09:11 04 March 2008 | UPDATED: 10:32 03 July 2010

PARENT power proved its worth yesterday as a new lollipop lady helped children reach their Norfolk school safely.

The patrol crossing near Caister Middle School was set up after two parents were forced to act as unofficial lollipop ladies because they were worried youngsters could be hit on clogged-up roads in the area.

PARENT power proved its worth yesterday as a new lollipop lady helped children reach their Norfolk school safely.

The patrol crossing near Caister Middle School was set up after two parents were forced to act as unofficial lollipop ladies because they were worried youngsters could be hit on clogged-up roads in the area.

Lorraine Lodge and Denise Hook donned high-visibility jackets and started helping children across Beach Road last October.

They decide to act after a six-year-old boy was hurt crossing the street.

The women were delighted yesterday to see that their five-month campaign had succeeded as Norfolk County Council hired a lollipop lady and also put down yellow lines so that cars will not block up roads.

Mrs Lodge, whose eight-year-old daughter Katie goes to the middle school, said: “Today has shown that parent power really works and, if enough people club together, you can make councils take action.”

While they were carrying out their unofficial crossing patrol, the two women were moved on by police community support officers because of concerns over health and safety.

As well as setting up a crossing patrol, the pair launched a petition demanding that an official crossing patrol be hired and that a 20mph speed limit be enforced.

The county council said that patrol crossings had not been set up in the past because not enough pupils walked to the school, but it had decided to act after a recent survey revealed more children were now walking there.

Ian Webb, in charge of Norfolk's 170 crossing patrols, said: “We are very pleased that this new crossing patrol is up and running and that it is making a safer environment for children.”


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