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New laws on fly-tippers welcomed

PUBLISHED: 13:12 12 February 2009 | UPDATED: 13:01 03 July 2010

ENVIRONMENTAL rangers from Great Yarmouth Borough Council have welcomed tough new sentencing guidelines for fly-tippers.

Magistrates are to be given new guidance on sentencing people who dump rubbish on the roadside - something which costs taxpayers in the borough thousands of pounds each year.

ENVIRONMENTAL rangers from Great Yarmouth Borough Council have welcomed tough new sentencing guidelines for fly-tippers.

Magistrates are to be given new guidance on sentencing people who dump rubbish on the roadside - something which costs taxpayers in the borough thousands of pounds each year.

Figures show that 2,470 fly-tipping incidents were reported in Yarmouth for 2007/08 which cost an estimated £157,612 to clear up.

For the same period the council took 14 prosecutions, all successful.

Magistrates are currently guided by a document called Costing the Earth, written in 2003, which is about to be updated to reflect the growing number of cases coming to court.

Welcoming the new guidelines environmental ranger Paul Shucksmith said: “Obviously we would welcome tougher sentencing because it would act as a deterrent. Generally, people who are prosecuted usually end up with a fine but I feel community sentencing would be more appropriate as it's about putting something back into the community.

A Magistrates' Association spokeswoman said: “Quite often we are criticised for not sentencing more harshly. However, often these crimes are dealt with by way of a fine and our problem is we have to abide by case law which says we should not fine anyone more than they can realistically pay in a year but it is often very tough getting accurate financial details from people.

“We also have the power to confiscate a vehicle where there is evidence it has been used in the act of fly tipping but often this is very difficult to prove unless there is CCTV footage or a photograph.”

Rangers are currently investigated a case of fly-tipping where dozens of tyres were dumped at the slip road off Gapton Hall Road, and Mr Shucksmith warned cases will only increase as the warmer weather arrives.

He urged people to be on the look-out for fly-tippers and warned off unruly waste collectors operating in the area. “One thing residents should look out for is people offering to collect waste, quite often these people will not be licensed and the rubbish ends up being dumped on the roadside.”

In anticipation of spring cleans Mr Shucksmith urged people check up on what items the tip at Caister actually accepts.

“Quite often people are surprised about what items the tips take. For example, the tip at Caister accepts tyres, although not from commercial companies.”

To find out more about what rubbish can be dumped at county council operated tips call 01493 846478 or visit www.norfolk.gov.uk.

The Mercury is continuing its Flytip Watch campaign in a bid to get local residents to supply us with information about fly-tippers operating in their area. We want to know dates, times and acts of fly-tipping that happen in your area, and if possible, pictures, which we will publish. Any information we receive will be passed on to the council and we do not reveal our sources. You must not put yourself in harms way.

You can send information to the Mercury, 169 King Street, Yarmouth, NR30 2PA, or email laura.bagshaw@archant.co.uk. Pictures need to be in a jpeg format and at least 500kb in size.

Fly-Tip Watch

Garfield Road, Yarmouth

Harley Road, Yarmouth,

Falcon Court, Yarmouth

North Denes Road, Yarmouth

Estcourt Road, Yarmouth

Granville Road, Cobholm

Century Road, Cobholm

Dog poo parade

Entrance to Cobholm Primary School

Bridge Road, Gorleston

Orde Avenue, Gorleston

Hopton clifftop

Area around Edward Worlledge Junior School

Burgh Road, close to Wroughton First School


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