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Nine schools hit by vomiting bug

PUBLISHED: 15:47 13 November 2008 | UPDATED: 12:16 03 July 2010

NINE schools in the Great Yarmouth have been hit by the winter vomiting bug so far - but only one has been forced to close.

They were Oriel High at Gorleston, John Grant at Caister, Rollesby Primary, Edward Worlledge and Southtown Infants in Great Yarmouth, Cobholm Primary, Wroughton Junior in Gorleston and Ormesby Infant and Junior.

NINE schools in the Great Yarmouth have been hit by the winter vomiting bug so far - but only one has been forced to close.

They were Oriel High at Gorleston, John Grant at Caister, Rollesby Primary, Edward Worlledge and Southtown Infants in Great Yarmouth, Cobholm Primary, Wroughton Junior in Gorleston and Ormesby Infant and Junior.

A spokeswoman for Norfolk County Council said the nine schools had not reported any further bugs since the outbreaks before half-term.

Cleaners were called in to disinfect classrooms and toilets at Oriel High during the half term holiday following the outbreak of the bug Norovirus, which causes vomiting and diarrhoea, on October 24.

Cobholm Primary School was forced to close.

Staff at both schools were advised to bring in the cleaners over half term after contacting the borough council's environmental health department following the outbreaks.

Oriel headteacher Paul Butler said there had not been a repeat since students had returned from half term and added the school did not have to close because the bug had only affected a relatively small proportion of the school's 600-strong roll.

The outbreak also happened on the final day before the half term break, which influenced the decision to stay open.

He said some of the 18 children had the virus at home and complained to teachers they were feeling sick when they arrived at school, adding that the normal procedure was for the children to stay in bed for 72 hours to give the bug time to clear.

He said: “If it had hit in the middle of term and we had 200 children going down with it, then it would have been seen as a bigger thing. Had enough staff and students gone down with the bug then we would have considered closing.”

A spokeswoman for Norfolk County Council said the nine schools had not reported any further bugs since the outbreak.

Symptoms of the virus include abdominal pain and nausea and it can be passed on either through contaminated food or person-to-person contact. The bug can be combated by hand washing and other rigorous cleaning.


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