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No arrests three months after £50m worth of cocaine washes up on Norfolk beaches

PUBLISHED: 18:52 05 May 2017 | UPDATED: 15:16 10 May 2017

Holdalls found washed up on Hopton beach near Great Yarmouth, containing around 360 kilos of cocaine. Picture: NATIONAL CRIME AGENCY/PA WIRE

Holdalls found washed up on Hopton beach near Great Yarmouth, containing around 360 kilos of cocaine. Picture: NATIONAL CRIME AGENCY/PA WIRE

There have been no arrests nearly three months after £50m worth of cocaine washed up on Norfolk beaches.

Valerie McGee with her dog Rudey who found £50 million of cocaine on Hopton beach.
PHOTO: Nick ButcherValerie McGee with her dog Rudey who found £50 million of cocaine on Hopton beach. PHOTO: Nick Butcher

There have been no arrests nearly three months after £50m worth of cocaine washed up on Norfolk beaches.

On February 12 a £50m of haul of cocaine washed up in the Great Yarmouth area.

The massive stash was discovered when Valerie McGee and her pet dog, Rudey, set off on their daily beach walk at Hopton and her inquisitive Irish

Holdalls found washed up on Hopton beach near Great Yarmouth, containing around 360 kilos of cocaine. Picture: NATIONAL CRIME AGENCY/PA WIREHoldalls found washed up on Hopton beach near Great Yarmouth, containing around 360 kilos of cocaine. Picture: NATIONAL CRIME AGENCY/PA WIRE

MORE: Police investigating reports of more drugs washing up on beaches

Setter noticed a cluster of sports bags on the shoreline.

There was a further discovery of the Class A drug, along the coast at Caister, the combined street value of the two discoveries could be worth more than £50m – thought to be the largest find in recent years.

The Seasider open top bus in Great Yarmouth, from its maiden voyage last year. Photo: George RyanThe Seasider open top bus in Great Yarmouth, from its maiden voyage last year. Photo: George Ryan

Further smaller discoveries were found at Hemsby, Happisburgh and Kessingland.

Chairman of Happisburgh Coast Watch Fred Rendell said there has not been any other sightings on the north Norfolk beach since February.

The 82-year-old added: “There were a few extra visitors on the beach, the car park did well out of it. People were nosing about.

MORE: Was the £50m cocaine haul thrown from a plane in a panic by drug-runners?

Mr Rendell added: “I personally believe it could have been put in the water anywhere, even on the other side of the sea.”

The wind direction in the days before the haul washed up were north and easterly, which indicates the drugs came from further north.

Speaking in February, drug trade expert Rusty Young told the IB Times the drugs may have been “thrown overboard” from a ship during a bust.

Mr Young, speaking to IB Times UK, said: “The major way drugs move around the world is on container ships. Often containers fall overboard or often, if they suspect they will get a proper search, they tip them overboard.

“Drug traffickers drive little submarines out to the container ships, the container ship then passes customs and another submarine comes out and unloads the cocaine, usually in the middle of the night.

At the time Norfolk’s police and crime commissioner wants to see a metaphorical “ring of steel” to protect the county from drug-dealing after 360 kilos of cocaine washed up on beaches.

A spokesman for the National Crime Agency, which is leading the operation, said there was no update but investigations were still very much ongoing.

Anyone with information should call Norfolk Police on 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

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