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Norfolk patients seen 'on time'

PUBLISHED: 10:07 03 December 2009 | UPDATED: 15:49 03 July 2010

Patients in Norfolk have “timely access” to services, according to health bosses.

The Department of Health has released statistics showing the number of patients seen within set targets, which include 26 weeks for an inpatient appointment and 13 weeks for outpatient treatment.

Patients in Norfolk have “timely access” to services, according to health bosses.

The Department of Health has released statistics showing the number of patients seen within set targets, which include 26 weeks for an inpatient appointment and 13 weeks for outpatient treatment.

Both NHS Norfolk and NHS Great Yarmouth and Waveney said all patients were seen on time during October 2009 with no patient waiting longer than 26 weeks to be admitted to hospital from a first appointment.

A total of 10,306 inpatients were admitted within 26 weeks and more than half went into hospital within four weeks - mainly the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cam-bridge, the James Paget University Hospital in Gorleston and the West Suffolk Hospital.

A total of 14,204 - all except one patient - were admitted for out-patient treatment within 12 weeks. More than half of outpatients were seen within four weeks.

Steve Davies, NHS Norfolk's interim chief operating officer, said: “NHS Norfolk is very proud of the performance of our hospitals in ensuring inpatients are seen within 26 weeks and outpatients within 12 weeks.

“The entire performance is a magnificent achievement by frontline staff.”

Health officials at NHS Great Yarmouth and Waveney said they had made reaching waiting times “a priority”.

John Turner, assistant director of information and performance analysis at NHS Great Yarmouth and Waveney, said: “Making sure that our patients receive timely access to good quality health services is one of our key priorities. During the past year, we have met all of our challenging waiting time targets, which means that patients are now receiving faster treatment than ever before. Occasionally a patient will wait for slightly longer if they have more complicated needs or choose not to begin their treatment when scheduled.”


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