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Orange paint spray riddle

PUBLISHED: 17:30 28 August 2008 | UPDATED: 11:41 03 July 2010

Miles Jermy

MYSTERY surrounds the source of a cloud of orange spray that was blown across an area of Great Yarmouth.

Specks of what appeared to be bright orange coloured paint coated houses and cars along South Quay, the Middlegate estate and the town's fire station on Wednesday last week.

MYSTERY surrounds the source of a cloud of orange spray that was blown across an area of Great Yarmouth.

Specks of what appeared to be bright orange coloured paint coated houses and cars along South Quay, the Middlegate estate and the town's fire station on Wednesday last week.

An investigation to trace the source of the substance is still being carried out by borough council environmental health officers.

Several staff vehicles parked at the fire station in Friars' Lane were coated in fine spots of the paint.

Fire and Rescue service spokesman Martin Barsby said: “We are currently looking into what the source of that paint might have been.

“This has happened before, and we are likely to claim compensation once it has been established where it came from.”

It is the latest in a number of similar incidents dating back several years that in the past has been linked to Richards dry dock and engineering on Southtown Road.

Jean Tills was amongst the residents living near South Quay whose home was splattered with orange and red coloured specks.

She said: “The windows of my flat were absolutely covered in the stuff; I believe this has been happening for the last eight years. There has been a considerable amount of damage to cars parked at the fire station during that time.

“How can this be allowed to continue? My main concern is the health for all the residents within the area, this substance could be toxic.”

“When the wind is in the opposite direction it affects residents on Southtown Road too.”

Enforcement action was taken three years ago to prevent over spray, following a series of complaints that paint had blown from the river front construction yard.

Senior environmental health officer Jeremy Marsh said: “We are in discussions with Richards regarding any breakdown of existing controls and any further measures that may be necessary.

“Any health concerns have been allayed as the paint particle size is too large to inhale and over the distance travelled any material would have been diluted and therefore is highly unlikely to be the cause of illness.

“It should be noted that the evidence gained thus far still remains circumstantial and at no time has it been seen or suggested that a cloud of overspray occurred. Richards have been co-operating with us to ensure that the likelihood of this recurring in the future is as small as possible.”

A statement issued on behalf of Richards management team said: “We take environmental issues very seriously and our health and safety ends>

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