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Ormesby church's Stamp of approval!

PUBLISHED: 09:13 03 November 2009 | UPDATED: 15:29 03 July 2010

VILLAGERS were today celebrating their 13th century church being given an official stamp of recognition.

For a stained glass window normally only admired by the 30-strong congregation of the small church in Ormesby St Michael, has at last been given the first class publicity it deserves - on the Royal Mail's Christmas stamps issue.

VILLAGERS were today celebrating their 13th century church being given an official stamp of recognition.

For a stained glass window normally only admired by the 30-strong congregation of the small church in Ormesby St Michael, has at last been given the first class publicity it deserves - on the Royal Mail's Christmas stamps issue.

The window, depicting a striking image of Madonna and Child, was the work of celebrated 19th century artist Henry Holiday who designed more than 300 stained glass windows.

It features on the Christmas first class stamp, available in normal and large sizes, available from post offices today.

All seven stamps in the collection feature work by artists associated with the Pre-Raphaelite movement.

Church warden John Hirst described it as “quite a coup” that the window on the east side of their church had been chosen for national attention.

He said: “It is certainly something we have been talking about. We are very proud of our church and very excited it has been given this publicity.”

The stamp is the latest in a long line featuring Norfolk churches and other views of the county.

Letheringsett village church starred in a 1972 stamp and two years later St Helen's Church in Norwich appeared on a 4.5p stamp. In 1994, a painting of Dersingham by Prince Charles featured on a stamp and in early 2006 an aerial shot of Brancaster was admired by philatelists.

Julietta Edgar, head of special stamps, Royal Mail, said: “We are extremely privileged to have access to such a rich history of beautiful stained glass designs in churches and other buildings around the UK.

“These precious images of the nativity have a timeless appeal and are a wonderful way of telling the story of Christmas here and around the world.”

Royal Mail alternates its Christmas collection every year between religious and secular themes.

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