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‘He had a joy for life’ - Tribute for ‘paper man’ who died while on his rounds

PUBLISHED: 14:21 08 September 2020 | UPDATED: 14:21 08 September 2020

Paul Gwyer, 72, known in Gorleston as 'the Paper Man', died suddenly on August 13. Picture: Courtesy of Juwelz Gwyer.

Paul Gwyer, 72, known in Gorleston as 'the Paper Man', died suddenly on August 13. Picture: Courtesy of Juwelz Gwyer.

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Paul Gwyer died while doing something he loved.

Paul Gwyer, 72, known in Gorleston as 'the Paper Man', died suddenly on August 13. Picture: Courtesy of Juwelz Gwyer.Paul Gwyer, 72, known in Gorleston as 'the Paper Man', died suddenly on August 13. Picture: Courtesy of Juwelz Gwyer.

He was in the middle of one of his paper rounds, on Sunday, August 13, and had just delivered an Advertiser to an address on Links Road in Gorleston, when he collapsed on the path after suffering a heart attack.

A woman driving past recognised him - everybody in the area knew Mr Gwyer - and she stopped her car before calling emergency services.

“It’s the paper man,” she told them.

After the paramedics arrived they pronounced him dead at the scene - he was 72 years old.

Juwelz and Paul Gwyer on their wedding day. Mr Gwyer, 72, known in Gorleston as 'the Paper Man', died suddenly on August 13. Picture: Courtesy of Juwelz Gwyer.Juwelz and Paul Gwyer on their wedding day. Mr Gwyer, 72, known in Gorleston as 'the Paper Man', died suddenly on August 13. Picture: Courtesy of Juwelz Gwyer.

Mr Gwyer was born in 1947 in Wordsley, a village in the West Midlands.

For most of his life he worked in engineering until redundancy led to an unexpected career change with a job at Co-op funeral services in Wolverhampton.

It was in that city, while playing darts for the same pub team, he met his future wife, Juwelz.

At the time they were both married to other people but remained friends and got together 16 years ago.

In 2011 the couple moved to Gorleston, following a dream to live on the Norfolk coast.

Mr Gwyer was employed for a while by Jary’s funeral directors before working again at Co-op funeral services until he retired.

Retirement didn’t suit him, though. He felt like he had to do something useful, so started delivering the Advertiser, one round at first, then two.

Soon he was doing six rounds across the south of Gorleston, dropping papers off at addresses around Links Road, Mariner’s Compass and Lowestoft Road.

It was more a vocation than a job - Mr Gwyer stopping and chatting with everybody, soon earning himself the nickname ‘The Paper Man’.

His wife has described him as “a big kid”.

“He was barmy. People described him as nuts. He had a joy for life and was always busy,” she said.

He loved scrumping, skip-diving, gardening and walking his dogs.

Ms Gwyer has expressed her gratitude to the woman who stopped and called 999 on the morning he died.

Those who knew Mr Gwyer can pay their respects just after 2pm on September 18 when his hearse will drive past McColl’s on Bridge Road, one of the places he did his paper round.

William, his 15-year-old son, will now take over the deliveries.


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