Aerial pictures show extent of erosion on Norfolk coast

2011: Erosion is already evident at Happisburgh, but many people still live close to the edge.

2011: Erosion is already evident at Happisburgh, but many people still live close to the edge. - Credit: Mike Page

Before and after photos show how drastic the changes have been to our coastline in only ten years.

Local photographer Mike Page has taken bird's-eye-view shots of the some of Norfolk's landmarks and coastline over the last few decades.

Recently Mr Page went out again - and the view from the sky shows the effect time has had on the beaches of Winterton and Happisburgh.

2011: Winterton beach was only a short walk from the sand dunes and the Dunes Cafe was still in place next to the sea.

2011: Winterton beach was only a short walk from the sand dunes and the Dunes Cafe was still in place next to the sea. - Credit: Mike Page

Ten years ago, Winterton beach was accessible from the dunes, following a short decline down to the shore.

Former landmarks such as the Dunes Cafe were still visible from the air in 2011.

Only a decade later and the beach is cut off from the dunes as erosion has created a sheer drop from a cliff face.

After choppy waters caused further erosion of the cliffs at Winterton, the cafe had to be demolished in 2020.

2021: Winterton beach is inaccessible from the sand dunes as the soft, sandy cliff formation has a sheer drop.

2021: Winterton beach is inaccessible from the sand dunes as the soft, sandy cliff formation has a sheer drop. - Credit: Mike Page

Over the past decade, many houses in Happisburgh have been claimed by the sea and ten years of erosion has taken its toll on the landscape.

Experts are predicting 50 metres of land to be lost by 2035 in the village.

2011: Erosion is already evident at Happisburgh, but many people still live close to the edge.

2011: Erosion is already evident at Happisburgh, but many people still live close to the edge. - Credit: Mike Page

2021: Happisburgh's cliffs are moving further westward as the sea claims more and more land.

2021: Happisburgh's cliffs are moving further westward as the sea claims more and more land. - Credit: Mike Page