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Questions raised over diabetes tests

PUBLISHED: 09:59 02 July 2009 | UPDATED: 14:18 03 July 2010

CHILDREN with diabetes are not getting all the care they should have in the county, according to a new report.

But the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital says that it is giving young people the recommended care - just that keeping all the records is too time-consuming to do.

CHILDREN with diabetes are not getting all the care they should have in the county, according to a new report.

But the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital says that it is giving young people the recommended care - just that keeping all the records is too time-consuming to do.

The report from the NHS Information Centre says: “Around the country, there are shining examples of good care. But overall, the picture is very worrying indeed. Only a tiny percentage (4pc) were receiving all the care processes recommended by NICE [the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence].

The information used for the report says that the NNUH is only giving young people one out of the eight recommended checks.

All young people get checks on their HbA1c, which is a measure of blood glucose. A high measure means that they are at risk of diabetic tissue damage. The other checks include cholesterol, blood pressure, body mass index and eye and foot examinations.

But NNUH spokesman Andrew Stronach said all the tests are being done. He said: “The Jenny Lind diabetes team already has a database for the collection of HbA1C tests but not for the others elements so completing the rest of the audit would be a manual process and extremely time-consuming.

“Children with diabetes do receive the other elements, it is just that the team do not have a database that readily records all of it for audit purposes.”

The paediatric units at the James Paget University Hospital in Gorleston and Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn are not registered with the National Diabetes Audit, so they are not covered by the report.

The Jenny Lind Diabetes team at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital looks after 345 children from Norfolk and Suffolk with type 1 diabetes. Most children with diabetes have type 1 diabetes, which requires injections of insulin to control blood sugar levels.

Nationally, 82pc of children and young people have a blood glucose levels above national targets. Nearly one in three children and young people have such high levels that they are almost certain to develop diabetic tissue damage.

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