Search

“It’s not a bad office” - rare reed cutters start work on Norfolk Broads

PUBLISHED: 18:24 21 March 2018 | UPDATED: 18:24 21 March 2018

Reed cutter Martin Beaumont ties a bundle of reed on the Norfolk Broads near Irstead, Norfolk. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Wire

Reed cutter Martin Beaumont ties a bundle of reed on the Norfolk Broads near Irstead, Norfolk. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Wire

Reed cutters who claim they are scarcer than royalty have started harvesting work on the Norfolk Broads.

Reed cutter Paul Eldridge carries bundles of reed on the Norfolk Broads near Irstead, Norfolk. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday March 21, 2018. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA WireReed cutter Paul Eldridge carries bundles of reed on the Norfolk Broads near Irstead, Norfolk. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday March 21, 2018. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Wire

The harvesting season runs from Christmas to Easter, and the majority of reed will be used for thatched roofs.

Reed cutter Paul Eldridge said: “There’s more royalty than there are reed cutters.”

He said this winter’s weather had caused problems, adding: “We’re so far behind this year, we’ve got to carry on no matter what.”

His colleague Rowan Nichols uses a machine to cut and bind the reed near Irstead, Norfolk, and he then piles the bundles on the marshes to air dry.

“Obviously we have a bit of work to clean all the reed out,” said Mr Eldridge.

“It tends to take twice as long to clean as it does to cut.”

He said reed harvested this week was due to be sold in May.

He estimated there are around three dozen reed cutters working in East Anglia, the centre of reed cutting in the UK, and a handful elsewhere.

But he said most reed was imported, as it is “cheaper than we can supply it”.

Working on the picturesque Norfolk Broads, with cruisers chugging past on the river, Mr Eldridge said he enjoys his work.

“It’s just that freedom of effectively not having a boss, being able to come in and work when you want, do when you want, and it’s the joy of just being here,” he said.

“It’s not a bad office, is it?”

Other News

School trips usually involve taking children to see one of Shakespeare’s great plays or visiting a historic museum.

A lifeboat has been called out to attend an injured crewman off the Norfolk coast.

Tears of joy streamed down the face of staff members who watched the magical moment a woman, who was left paralysed by a stroke, stood on her own two feet for the first time in 15 years.

Plans for a former pub to be turned into a luxury tobacconist have been put under fire by a nearby health centre, with bosses arguing it would “give out entirely the wrong message”.

Most Read

Plans for a former pub to be turned into a luxury tobacconist have been put under fire by a nearby health centre, with bosses arguing it would “give out entirely the wrong message”.

Read more
NHS
09:21

A joyrider was arrested after crashing into a traffic bollard - and was found to be more than three times the legal driving limit when police breathalysed him.

Read more

Would you like to play a major part in restoring one of Great Yarmouth’s most historic tourist attractions to its former glory?

Read more
Barry Coleman
Yesterday, 16:09

One Great Yarmouth home has fully embraced the Christmas spirit this year, all in the name of a good cause.

Read more

School trips usually involve taking children to see one of Shakespeare’s great plays or visiting a historic museum.

Read more

Local Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 8°C

min temp: -1°C

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists

Digital Edition

cover

Enjoy the Great
Yarmouth Mercury

e-edition today

Subscribe

Newsletter Sign Up

Great Yarmouth Mercury weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy