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Road closed for outer harbour

PUBLISHED: 09:26 25 January 2010 | UPDATED: 16:25 30 June 2010

Great Yarmouth's £80m outer harbour moved a significant step closer to full operation over the weekend when the road round South Denes was finally blocked to public traffic.

Great Yarmouth's £80m outer harbour moved a significant step closer to full operation over the weekend when the road round South Denes was finally blocked to public traffic.

Drivers found no entry signs erected near the power station on the seafront side of the land strip with traffic being directed to turn right off South Beach Parade into Hartmann Road.

On the river side, South Denes Road was closed at the harbour mouth with drivers having to use the new turning circle there.

The road closure, ending a tradition of car cruises round the peninsula enjoyed by holidaymakers and locals alike for generations, heralds the arrival by lorry of new gates and fencing this week.

The work is being carried out to meet Customs and security requirements ahead of the arrival of the first container vessel expected in the next few weeks.

EastPort chief executive Eddie Freeman was last night unable to give a date for that symbolic step, but pointed to the presence in the harbour of the cable-laying vessel AMT Discoverer as evidence that the port was “already open for business”.

Graham Plant, the borough council's cabinet member for regeneration, said although some residents were concerned about the loss of access to the end of South Denes, the road closure was “part of a positive story for Norfolk as well as the town”.

He said: “In the bigger picture we have to be really grateful that we have a port that will be there in a 100 years time and will improve the fortunes of the borough.”

Mr Plant said the deep-water harbour was perfectly placed to gain business from the massive expansion of offshore windfarm development announced by the Government earlier this month.

He said the council would be “putting a welcome mat out” for companies engaged in energy-related industries as they saw a big future for the town in gas field and windfarm maintenance.

Bid to regenerate coastal towns. Turn to page 8.


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