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Slow down call in rural areas

PUBLISHED: 09:52 13 May 2010 | UPDATED: 17:44 30 June 2010

Communities plagued by speeding have resoundingly backed a call for motorists to slow down as they drive through the region's villages, after a study revealed the extent of the problem.

Communities plagued by speeding have resoundingly backed a call for motorists to slow down as they drive through the region's villages, after a study revealed the extent of the problem.

A survey by campaign group Brake, out today, shows that nearly three quarters of motorists admit to driving at 35mph in a 30mph limit.

The findings have prompted communities in Norfolk and Suffolk once again to urge drivers to slow down.

Norfolk Brake campaigner Liz Voysey said: “Speeding in some of Norfolk's little villages is worse than anywhere.

“Speed limits are put there for a reason, not just to inconvenience people. They make it really easy for drivers by telling them what speeds are safe - but there is just a total arrogance and selfishness in drivers who refuse to follow them. There would be more people alive today if drivers stuck to the speed limits.”

Brake's survey of 9,000 drivers shows that 72pc of people behind the wheel admit breaking 30mph speed limits by 5mph, with 36pc of drivers breaking the limit between once a day and once a week.

But traffic camera statistics suggest the actual number of speeding journeys may be far higher. Nationally, 49pc of all cars exceed 30mph limits, with 18pc of all cars travelling at 35mph or more.

Hopton, near Great Yarmouth, was the first village to introduce a speedwatch scheme in the region, which sees villagers wear high-visibility jackets and patrol the roadside with a speedgun, passing information on to the police.

Parish council chairman Mike Butcher said: “Most people don't actually realise the speed they're doing. There are streets in all our villages where we all know people speed.”

However, while community speedwatch programmes have helped lower speeds through a number of the region's communities, this week Bradwell Parish Council had to ditch plans to introduce a scheme after only two people volunteered to take part since October.


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