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Street signs work poised for May start

PUBLISHED: 12:31 14 April 2009 | UPDATED: 13:41 03 July 2010

AS vandals continue to add to the backlog, a £130,000 scheme to repair and replace worn-out street signs in north Norfolk finally looks set to begin next month.

AS vandals continue to add to the backlog, a £130,000 scheme to repair and replace worn-out street signs in north Norfolk finally looks set to begin next month.

In September North Norfolk District Council agreed to set aside the money to help speed up an existing project which aims to undo the effects of age, car crashes and vandalism on the district's street furniture.

The go-ahead was given in December following delays due to pressures on the council's budget and after a search for contractors the work looks set to begin in the next few weeks.

But in a report to go before councillors on Wednesday, environmental health officer Chris Cawley warns of continuing vandalism which is leaving even new signs, funded by a £25,000 cash injection two years ago, in need of repairs.

He says: “The worrying situation has arisen in some places where vandals have found they cannot damage the lettering of the new-style plates so they have attacked the whole sign assembly. Such cases are sheer wanton vandalism which no design of street furniture will withstand.”

The damage has been reported to police and the council is appealing to communities for their help to deter the vandals.

Yet despite that setback, Mr Cawley will tell Wednesday's overview and scrutiny committee he is pleased with the progress being made.

A survey is currently being carried out to assess how many signs are missing or damaged and new ones are due to be ordered soon.

Mr Cawley says the next wave of work will help to clear the backlog at a much faster pace and add to the 400 signs which were either repaired or replaced last financial year following the previous crackdown.

He says: “The time gap between signs being reported as needing attention and being actioned is starting to reduce through the ongoing programme. The timescale is now less that five years and will reduce significantly further as the current project is progressed.”


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