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Stunning Scroby micro climate

PUBLISHED: 15:59 17 February 2010 | UPDATED: 16:43 30 June 2010

The fog surrounding Scroby Sands windfarm

The fog surrounding Scroby Sands windfarm

An offshore wind farm has been creating its own 'micro-climate' by stirring up air to create low-level clouds around its giant, spinning blades.

This stunning picture shows the mist caused by the spinning 40m blades of the turbines whipping up moisture from the surface of the sea at Scroby Sands near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk.

An offshore wind farm has been creating its own 'micro-climate' by stirring up air to create low-level clouds around its giant, spinning blades.

This stunning picture shows the mist caused by the spinning 40m blades of the turbines whipping up moisture from the surface of the sea at Scroby Sands near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. Each of the 60-metre turbines has three spinning blades which stir up the warmer air at sea level into the cooler and drier air above, creating the mists.

The turbine's blades create clouds which hang over the offshore farm - even though the coastline remains clear

Photographer Mike Page took a series of striking photographs to illustrate the mist while flying overhead in his Cessna 150 light aircraft.

He said: 'The creation of the mist depends on the wind speed and the temperature of the sea and the air at the time. The spinning blades whip moisture up into the air like giant egg mixers and sometimes these low cloud formations are made.”

Emma Sharples, of the private weather forecasting service Weatherquest, said: 'Anything natural or manmade feature can create a micro-climate around itself.

'You do need some sort of movement in the air for mist or fog to form and this is what appears to be happening here. The warmer air from the sea containing moisture can create mist when it is mixed with the cooler, drier air above. However, the wind speed has to be just right. If is a really windy day it is not going to happen because too much wind will disperse it.'

She said that the phenomenon was more likely to apply to sea-based wind farms because of the effects of moist air and the difference in temperature between the land and the air is much smaller.

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