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Local photographer’s work selected for cover of Stephen King novel

PUBLISHED: 16:14 13 December 2018 | UPDATED: 16:14 13 December 2018

Tracy Collyer, 48, of Hopton, picked up a camera five years ago, since then her artwork has been showcased in bookstores across the globe and her mental health has improved. Picture: Contributed

Tracy Collyer, 48, of Hopton, picked up a camera five years ago, since then her artwork has been showcased in bookstores across the globe and her mental health has improved. Picture: Contributed

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A photographer who has secured the front cover of a re-release of Stephen King’s ‘Dreamcatcher’ has used art to overcome her mental health struggles.

A photographer who has secured the front cover of a re-release of Stephen King’s ‘Dreamcatcher’ has used art to overcome her mental health struggles.

Tracy Collyer, 48, of Hopton, picked up a camera five years ago, since then her artwork has been showcased in bookstores across the globe and her mental health has improved.

Before she started snapping pictures, the mother-of-two said her “confidence was on the floor”.

“I went to Mind as a service user and took my camera, at Mind they convinced me to do a beginners course,

“I was then told to go on and do my A-levels and it took me two years to complete those,” Mrs Collyer said.

The Great Yarmouth and Waveney Mind Volunteer has had seven photographs become a front cover for best-selling books.

Titles which have adorned Mrs Collyer’s work include Beverly Bartons, The Dying Game and The Hunger by Alma Katsu.

Despite having her photograph printed on best-sellers, Mrs Collyer only gets around £30 for her image, but the kick she gets from seeing the front cover is unmatched.

“When I heard I was so excited, I have read all of Stephen King’s books,” she said.

The re-release of ‘Dreamcatcher’ will be displayed in stores across France.

For an author who is usually associated with dark and harrowing stories, Mrs Collyer said her shot at Fritton Wood in Great Yarmouth was suited to the novel.

“When I do take those kind of pictures, I am generally in a dark place but photography brings me out of it.

“I generally get paranoid and anxious when I am out, but as soon as I step behind the camera and look through the lens I am fine,” she said.

She found using photography as a way to express her feelings and it served as a self-help tool to take care of her own mental health.

This weekend the photography group, which is run from Great Yarmouth & Waveney Mind’s Community Garden Project in Southtown will be submitting work to the charity’s upcoming art exhibition, which is also being organised by Tracy.

The artists will showcase their work at the Fisher Patterson Gallery, Great Yarmouth Library, from Thursday 13th December to Saturday 15th December.

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