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Teens given 30 months for drug dealing and possession of machete and hunting knife

PUBLISHED: 17:29 30 May 2018 | UPDATED: 20:30 30 May 2018

Denzel Maposa was sentanced to 30 months for drug dealing and having bladed article. Picture: Norfolk Constabulary

Denzel Maposa was sentanced to 30 months for drug dealing and having bladed article. Picture: Norfolk Constabulary

Norfolk Constabulary

A judge highlighted the dangers of drug dealers carrying “ugly” weapons as he sentenced two teenagers arrested in Great Yarmouth as part of a week of action against county line drug dealing networks.

Jordan Hunte-Anson was sentanced to 30 months for drug dealing and having bladed article. Picture: Norfolk ConstabularyJordan Hunte-Anson was sentanced to 30 months for drug dealing and having bladed article. Picture: Norfolk Constabulary

Jordon Hunte-Anson, 18, and Denzel Maposa, 19, were stopped in a car in Devonshire Road by police and Maposa was found with 30 wraps of cocaine and heroin, while Hunte-Anson was found with 250 wraps of cocaine and heroin, Norwich Crown Court heard.

Duncan O’Donnell, prosecuting, said Maposa was also found with a machete tucked in his waistband while Hunte-Anson was carrying a large hunting knife.

He said that Hunte-Anson was found with £51 cash and Maposa had £135 in cash on him.

Hunte-Anson, of Bloomfield Avenue, Luton, admitted two counts of possession with intent to supply a Class A drug and possession of a knife on March 20.

Maposa, from Bromley Gardens in Houghton Regis, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, also pleaded guilty to two counts of possession with intent to supply a Class A drug on March 20 and possession of a machete.

Judge David Goodin imposed 30 months custody on both men and told them that the weapons, which were part of the drug dealing culture, were capable of causing “significant” injury.

He said: “Each of you were armed with pretty business-like effective weapons, tucked in your waistband with the plain intention to use them should it have been necessary.”

He accepted they were not carrying the weapons with an aggressive intent but said: “They were there to be used and I have no doubt they would have been, if necessary.”

He added: “These were ugly weapons capable of causing significant damage, which is why you had them with you.”

David Wilson, for Maposa, said that he had made a poor life choice when he agreed to deliver the drugs.

He said he was a promising young man who obtained five GCSEs and was hoping to return to college.

Rob Pollington, for Hunte-Anson, said that he had come to Great Yarmouth to deliver the drugs in the hope of earning some “easy money”.

He said he hoped to be paid about £300 delivering the drugs.

He said that Hunte-Anson was hoping to learn a trade at college.

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