Tony hangs up microphone

TONY Mallion, the well-known broadcaster and supporter of charities in the Great Yarmouth area, hung up his microphone before Christmas.Tony Mallion began his career as a cub reporter on the Mercury and leaves his profession as a familiar voice on Radio Norfolk.

TONY Mallion, the well-known broadcaster and supporter of charities in the Great Yarmouth area, hung up his microphone before Christmas.

Tony Mallion began his career as a cub reporter on the Mercury and leaves his profession as a familiar voice on Radio Norfolk.

Gorleston born-and-bred, Tony's final full day at Radio Norfolk included producing the annual pantomime carol service live from St Peter Mancroft church in Norwich.

He is a champion of the east coast and from the new year the 58-year-old will be turning his hand to banging the drum for his home patch in another way. His plans are yet to be finalised but he says: “I hope to be involved in promoting Yarmouth in a variety of different ways.”


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During his four decades covering Norfolk he has had a number of highlights and significant moments. Producing Radio Norfolk's coverage of the Queen Mother's death and the Diana, Princess of Wales memorial service will both linger in the memory, he says, but as is often the case in journalism, telling the untold stories of less well known people has proved just as memorable as the grand occasions.

He revealed: “When I was doing my mid-morning programme, I did it once from the Pleasure Beach at Blackpool, because everyone compares Yarmouth with Blackpool. We went on the rollercoaster. I wanted to give a commentary as we went around and they said it couldn't be done, but we did it! But as I got off and handed the recorder over, it was pointed out it hadn't recorded…”

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Tony worked for 15 years in print journalism, from September 1968 straight from what's now Oriel High School in Gorleston until May 1983, when he formed part of the team that launched Radio Broadland. Three years later he moved to the BBC and has been there ever since.

He continues to live in Gorleston, where his wife, Jenny, is a specialist in palliative care at the James Paget University Hospital. Their three children - Clare, James and Tom - are all in their 20s and Tom is studying for a degree in media production.

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